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Dilbert Classics by Scott Adams

Dilbert Classics

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  1. A Common 'tater commented on Ripley's Believe It or Not about 8 hours ago

    I’m confusing nothing… Sydenham’s chorea or chorea minor (historically referred to as Saint Vitus Dance) is a disorder characterised by rapid, uncoordinated jerking movements primarily affecting the face, hands and feet. Check your own facts before accusing someone else of being confused.

  2. A Common 'tater commented on Bliss about 16 hours ago

    20-1 against…

  3. A Common 'tater commented on Cornered about 16 hours ago

    Don’t you just hate it when the saliva gets into the keyboard…

  4. A Common 'tater commented on Ripley's Believe It or Not about 16 hours ago

    Not sure what the connection is but St. Vitus’ Dance (an expression my mother used to use) was a social phenomenon that occurred primarily in mainland Europe between the 14th and 17th centuries. It involved groups of people dancing erratically, sometimes thousands at a time. The mania affected men, women, and children, who danced until they collapsed from exhaustion.

  5. A Common 'tater commented on Jump Start 2 days ago

    I literally bumped into Idi Amin in Jeddah, 1981. He wasn’t very nice, neither were his bodyguards.

  6. A Common 'tater commented on Working Daze 2 days ago

    …and an induction power pick-up. Only item necessary on her desk is the monitor. No cables or keyboard any more.

  7. A Common 'tater commented on Minimum Security 2 days ago

    Your definition of Capitalism is even better than Stephanie’s… a controlling, pitiful, outdated social structure.

  8. A Common 'tater commented on Calvin and Hobbes 2 days ago

    …and Sheldon can tell you the origin of the word “toast”.

  9. A Common 'tater commented on Ripley's Believe It or Not 2 days ago

    I’m more concerned about the ageist, heightist and weightist demands of BOEING (but interestingly enough, not sexist).

  10. A Common 'tater commented on Ripley's Believe It or Not 2 days ago

    I’ll tell you what… you tell me what was considered late-19th-century American exercise (for humans) and I’ll research the French equivalent. You’ll probably find that the American version was copied from the French, in the first place.