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  1. McKathlin commented on Lucky Cow about 1 year ago

    Only to sign my name. The moment they stopped requiring cursive for our written assignments in school, I switched pack to printed handwriting. Print is easier to read.

  2. McKathlin commented on C'est la Vie about 1 year ago

    Awww… :)

  3. McKathlin commented on Jump Start about 1 year ago

    Olivet may refer to the Mount of Olives, a significant place in the Holy Land. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_of_Olives

  4. McKathlin commented on Jump Start about 1 year ago

    I took her thought bubble to mean “This guy talks about this planet like he’s not from here.” But yours is an interesting take as well.

  5. McKathlin commented on Luann about 1 year ago

    Someone who lives with her parents does; a teenager wants much more privacy than she typically gets. I suspect that these two would have liked some “action” along with their talking, but they also genuinely enjoy talking and just spending time together. And time flew.

  6. McKathlin commented on Luann Againn over 1 year ago

    Maybe, but there’s enough room for individual variation that a particular boy could be worse at math than his little sister…or just lazy.

  7. McKathlin commented on Lucky Cow over 1 year ago

    Life has 4g sugar per serving (on par with Wheaties), and Cinnamon Life, 8g. That’s more than Cheerios’ 1g or Kix’s 3g, but less than the typical sugary cereal’s 11-15g, or (believe it or not) raisin bran’s 18g.

  8. McKathlin commented on Watch Your Head over 1 year ago

    To fill you in, Omar has been meeting and getting to know his biological family, and it turns out they’re Samoan.

  9. McKathlin commented on Lucky Cow over 1 year ago

    He may have taught her, but she didn’t learn.

  10. McKathlin commented on Jump Start over 1 year ago

    I’m guessing she’s writing about the father, since he’s the one who wrote The Count of Monte Cristo. Thanks to this comic I read up on both. It’s fascinating, seeing the interplay of art and personal relationships in those two writers’ lives.