Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson

Phoebe and Her Unicorn

Comments (17) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. DreamScourge

    DreamScourge said, over 2 years ago

    Good to see they still challenge kids these days.

  2. Pinkie Pie

    Pinkie Pie said, over 2 years ago

    I still remember our second grade class having spelling bees one day. I won the first one and during the second my dad came to pick me up. He decided to wait and watch from the doorway and I won that one too. I remember how proud he looked and I felt. One of my happier school memories.

  3. Happy, Happy, Happy!!! http://www.gofundme.com/z6x6x4vs

    Happy, Happy, Happy!!! http://www.gofundme.com/z6x6x4vs GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    i can see her swinging her feet back and forth, sitting on that too tall stool…
    : D

  4. Starman Stormtrooper

    Starman Stormtrooper said, over 2 years ago

    I wish the words I had for my spelling bee were that easy.

  5. rpmurray

    rpmurray said, over 2 years ago

    I’ll bet she learned this one from Mr. Evil Piano Teacher.

  6. kaykeyser

    kaykeyser said, over 2 years ago

    no points for showing of Pheebs. now spell Qualm. (points if you get the reference)

  7. kaykeyser

    kaykeyser said, over 2 years ago

    Also you must pay more attention to music class then I did since you know about musical flourishes that are not necessary to carry the overall line of the melody (or harmony), but serve instead to decorate or “ornament” that line.

  8. JeepersCreepers

    JeepersCreepers said, over 2 years ago

    I’m not going to lie – I had to google “appoggiatura”.

  9. John W Kennedy

    John W Kennedy GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    But it’s only when you get near the professional level that you learn how, for a couple hundred years, for songs and other stuff accompanied by only one or two instruments, the composer would just write the melody and the most important notes of the bass line, and let the organ/harpsichord/lute player and the bass player figure out the rest. (Hey, writing music with a dip pen takes a long time.) Only sometimes the vocal line would be likely to confuse the players, so a whole system was created for writing a simplified version of the melody that made it easier for the players to figure out the chords, while the singer had to learn that whenever a composer wrote a melody that went like /this/ you really had to sing /that/. For example, " mi | do do " (where | is a barline), almost always means you should really sing " mi | re do ". Of course, since every composer had his own habits, and even their habits changed from year to year, you can get a D. Mus. working on this stuff.

    This system was used for most home music, so when you see the young ladies playing the piano in a Jane Austen movie or the like, remember, they’re actually playing from the period equivalent of a fake book.

  10. Tandembuzz

    Tandembuzz said, over 2 years ago

    When I was in fourth grade, Mrs. Booth would always give “Czechoslovakia” to winnow the last few out of the field. Every smart kid in the class learned to spell Czechoslovakia (always remembering “Capital C…”). To this day, I can still spell it. Good job, Mrs. Booth!

  11. ujean

    ujean said, over 2 years ago

    @JeepersCreepers

    So did I. As a public service to the curious and busy:
    Music. The Appoggiatura An embellishing note, usually one step above or below the note it precedes and indicated by a small note or special sign.

  12. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    It means “reverse pleat.”

  13. Comic Minister

    Comic Minister said, over 2 years ago

    Correct Phoebe.

  14. Tom Flapwell

    Tom Flapwell said, over 2 years ago

    Is this a nod to “Psych,” where that longer word tripped up a contestant?

  15. John W Kennedy

    John W Kennedy GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    That’s what “appoggiatura” means in /modern/ music. But for a few hundred years it was used in connection with the practice I describe above—the extra and altered notes that the singer was expected to recognize and sing because they belonged there, even though they weren’t written down. (It also applied to solo keyboard music, written with only a simplified melody and an outline of the bass, with the player expected to improvise the details of the melody, the rest of the bass, and all the other notes in between.)

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