Peanuts by Charles Schulz

Peanuts

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  1. jdbaka

    jdbaka said, over 2 years ago

    May 12, 1967
    http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1967/05/12#.U2xxDF44nQs

  2. Jo Clear (aka: Grasshopper)

    Jo Clear (aka: Grasshopper) GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    Linus always has everything thought out to the T…Myself, I dont think I’d even want to be the 44th…..

  3. Mr Nobody

    Mr Nobody said, over 2 years ago

    Only 30 more, and he’ll get his turn.

  4. orinoco womble

    orinoco womble said, over 2 years ago

    Ah yes, by now we were all supposed to be living the Jetsons lifestyle, in our super-suits, and commuting to and fro to work on the moon. Remember it well. This is the future that looked so bright and shiny in the sixties.

  5. Jest Phulin

    Jest Phulin said, over 2 years ago

    Fun thought for the day on technology progression: During World War 1, horse-mounted cavalry was a viable military unit. The military tends to have the latest technology. Tanks weren’t in battle until 1916. In less than 65 years, technology went from using animal power to walking on the moon.
    Wait a minute — It’s been 45 years. Where are our jet-packs??

  6. Billy Jay

    Billy Jay GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    Hi Orinoco Womble, I well remember those visions of the future too. We had a TV programme in the UK called “Tomorrow’s World” and I always remember one episode which explained all about nuclear power stations and how electricity made by them would be so inexpensive it would cost too much money to bill the customer so it would be free on demand.
    Looking at my energy bills, something seems to have gone a little wrong.

  7. Cooncat

    Cooncat said, over 2 years ago

    There have only been 12 men who’ve stepped foot on the moon … and since we can’t even get our own astronauts up to the ISS by ourselves any more, it would appear its going to be a LONG time before any Americans do anything on the leading edge of space exploration. Guess we’ll just sit back and let the Chinese do that ….

  8. Nabuquduriuzhur

    Nabuquduriuzhur said, over 2 years ago

    @Jest Phulin

    We had cavalry units at the start of WWII. The Soviets made extensive used of cavalry. The Germans had several cavalry units, including the fifteenth SS Cossack Cavalry Corps. The germans had much of their equipment and guns moved by horse carts because of a shortage of trucks. The Poles had the uhlanys.
    .
    When I was a kid in the 1970s and 1980s, we expected to be on mars by the 1980s. Could have actually done it, too. But in 1986 the nuclear propulsion being worked at in places like Area 25 Nellis, and JPL was halted by Thurmond and O’neill’s Congress. Forty years of research gone into the toilet.
    .
    Good grief, we had prototypes of engines that could run for weeks. Mercury vapor gas core engine, various straight fission engines, argon gas core engine was being worked on when Congress killed any chance of getting out there. A 1/4g constant acceleration for half a trip, turn around and decelerate and one is at mars in 4 days. Even in 1970, project orion at Area 25 had a fission rocket that fired for more than an hour.
    .
    Imagine how the outer solar system would now be explored by unmanned missions with 2 or 3gs acceleration. And how much cheaper it would be to use shuttles with a few pounds of refined fissionables vs. millions of pounds of hydrogen and oxygen like the space shuttle did.

  9. Thomas Scott Roberts

    Thomas Scott Roberts GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    Shhh! Charlie Brown, you blockhead, you just tipped off that this is a repeat from before the first moon landing.

  10. Thomas Scott Roberts

    Thomas Scott Roberts GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @orinoco womble

    Because we were naive. Science never quite defeats that inability to understand the downside of human nature.

  11. Thomas Scott Roberts

    Thomas Scott Roberts GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @orinoco womble

    Speaking of Orinoco Womble… he might, just might, be making a cameo in a certain feature drawn by yours truly soon.

  12. Thomas Scott Roberts

    Thomas Scott Roberts GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @Billy Jay

    Again, when it comes to scientific advancement, we become starry eyed and naive. Will Eisner was interviewed about a SPIRIT story he drew in the 1940’s, showing a magnificent future with glass bubble cities in the sky- where crime and poverty were extinct. It was set in the 70’s, and he confessed that people really imagined that coming true by then. So by the 60’s, we were merely readjusting our expectations a few more decades when we realized we weren’t ‘almost there.’

  13. Thomas Scott Roberts

    Thomas Scott Roberts GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @Cooncat

    Our one small step came at a time when society was changing in ways no scientist had foreseen. Suddenly a new social consciousness was growing. A pointless war had dragged on too long- political corruption was no longer even pretending to be hidden. More and more people wanted to know why we weren’t concentrating on what was happening right here on Earth, instead of worrying about bouncing about on a lifeless sphere. So we turned against the space program just when it was finally in our grasp.

  14. Thomas Scott Roberts

    Thomas Scott Roberts GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @Nabuquduriuzhur

    We had the technology, but people on Earth were starving, and the public began to notice that. Suddenly public interest in the space program fizzled.

    Yet I remember watching that moon landing. I remember. all through elementary school, TV sets on wheels coming into the classroom so we could follow the progress tha got us there.

    How quickly we went from “OH BOY!” (John Glenn) to disinterest, and now an ever growing number of conspiracy theorists convinced that the moon landing never really happened.

    We’re brilliant, but we’re not smart.

  15. dheine1971

    dheine1971 said, over 2 years ago

    Two years after this strip ran, who became the first man on the moon? I think it was Neil Armstrong.

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