Peanuts by Charles Schulz

Peanuts

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  1. Squizzums

    Squizzums said, about 19 hours ago

    Next she’ll give you the honorable task of clearing out the asbestos.

  2. TEMPLO S.U.D.

    TEMPLO S.U.D. said, about 19 hours ago

    Are chalkboards still used these days? No need to clap clean erasers when it comes to marker boards.

  3. F6F5Hellcat

    F6F5Hellcat said, about 19 hours ago

    @TEMPLO S.U.D.

    Actually, in some schools they unbelievably are still in use. I volunteer for Destination Imagination yearly and get to see various classrooms. The vast majority are whiteboards, so no need for chalk there since they require dry erase markers. But I have seen a handful of classrooms over the last twenty years that actually still use blackboards (wonder why they didn’t call them chalkboards as some of the classrooms I’ve been in, both when I was in school and since, have had green blackboards)

  4. Linux0s

    Linux0s said, about 18 hours ago

    The dreaded chalk lung claims another victim.

  5. 38lowell

    38lowell said, about 18 hours ago

    Many die, for honor!

  6. Jo Clear (aka: Grasshopper)

    Jo Clear (aka: Grasshopper) GoComics PRO Member said, about 18 hours ago

    I also remember being the chosen one to clean the chalk erasers…But there was no one to see the honor…being it was after school…when I got home I told everyone and they just didn’t seem as thrilled…oh well…I still think it was one of my most shining moments…ya just gotta be there and be a kid again to know….

  7. orinoco womble

    orinoco womble said, about 17 hours ago

    In my parents’ day (1930s), apparently being sent out to clap erasers was more of a punishment…maybe a time-out. For me in the 60s, it was a privilege. We were sent out either alone or in pairs at recess time. The school was red-brick and if the erasers were particularly dusty, some students would make a design on the wall with the chalk dust.

    The old felt erasers were a pain because they dirtied the board more than they cleaned it. The best were the foam-rubber ones that had a kind of chamois leather on one side. That really cleaned up the board and made it a pleasure to write on, but the teacher usually reserved that one for her own use.

  8. TammiFunnies

    TammiFunnies said, about 16 hours ago

    Whiteboards are easier. Just wipe the ink away.

  9. Say What?

    Say What? said, about 15 hours ago

    @TammiFunnies

    Whiteboards are also a lot more fun to draw on.

  10. K.C. Fahel

    K.C. Fahel said, about 13 hours ago

    @TammiFunnies

    I prefer the smell of chalk to the rancid smell of the erasable markers used for white boards.

  11. Stephen Treadwell

    Stephen Treadwell said, about 13 hours ago

    This happened in Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown, but w/ Linus instead of CB.

  12. Cooncat

    Cooncat said, about 13 hours ago

    Since my home was next door to my parochial grade school playground, I frequently had “eraser duty”. However, along with “clapping the erasers”, we had to take big sponges and wash down the ‘black boards", leaving NO STREAKS behind. We also had to get down on hands and knees and use a bench brush to clean the aisles between the rows of desks, and under the desk frames as well. These had to be clean, because you never knew when we’d have a ‘nuclear bomb alert’ and have to dive under our desks, holding our hand over the back of our neck so we wouldn’t get cut from flying glass. Yep, that’s for real …

  13. So  Lonely

    So Lonely said, about 12 hours ago

    I remember that,but it would have been better just to wash and dry them

  14. Cronkers McGee

    Cronkers McGee GoComics PRO Member said, about 12 hours ago

    I remember being ask to do that back in the 1970’s.

  15. Albert Alcoceba

    Albert Alcoceba GoComics PRO Member said, about 12 hours ago

    My teacher would throw the chalk at students who were no paying attention! Worse than chalk duster duty was incinerator duty (emptying rubbish bins into the big incinerator)

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