Oyster War by Ben Towle

Oyster War

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  1. Nabuquduriuzhur

    Nabuquduriuzhur said, about 1 year ago

    That’s the spirit! 200 proof!

  2. Three Steps Over Japan

    Three Steps Over Japan said, about 1 year ago

    I conquer, we need to divide and concur the enemy, or all our horses will be sunk.

  3. edclectic

    edclectic said, about 1 year ago

    Concur? A dog that’s been to prison?

  4. ViscountNiklos

    ViscountNiklos said, about 1 year ago

    I became an optimist when I discovered that I wasn’t going to win any more games by being anything else. – Earl Weaver

  5. EeyoreBlue

    EeyoreBlue said, about 1 year ago

    So…. They’re gong to cull the cur to make ’im a con? Cool!

  6. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, about 1 year ago

    Then enemy had to concur when they capitulated and were conquered.

  7. Veteran

    Veteran GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    I concur.
    Now it will be fun to see them raise a sunken sub.
    I hope he remembered to close the hatch…and let his buddy leave with him.
    Remember this is the Commander.
    Last orders “You hide it on the bottom…I will come back and get it later.”
    And when you go off duty you have to go below decks with this commander…..some crew may have wanted to see the sun set.

  8. F6F5Hellcat

    F6F5Hellcat said, about 1 year ago

    Wonder why they couldn’t have come up with a use for Alligator before the war ended. After all, in reality she sank in April 1863.

  9. Three Steps Over Japan

    Three Steps Over Japan said, about 1 year ago

    @F6F5Hellcat

    Because all the subsequent battles were 40 miles inland?

  10. Nabuquduriuzhur

    Nabuquduriuzhur said, about 1 year ago

    re: three steps

    might have found some use in coastal blockades or up the mississippi

  11. F6F5Hellcat

    F6F5Hellcat said, about 1 year ago

    @Three Steps Over Japan

    No, not all subsequent battles were 40 miles inland. The Battle of Cherbourg was thousands of miles east of where USS Sumpter (yes, Sumpter with a p, that was the actual spelling) was forced to cut Alligator loose. CSS Albama vs. USS Kersarge in one of the last great naval duel of the war fought off the coast of Cherbourg, France in June 1864. Kersarge sank the Alabama


    And what about Hunley? The CSS H.L. Hunley sank the USS Housatonic months before the duel between the Alabama and the Kersarge. This is what I was wondering about, why they wouldn’t have come up with the idea of using Alligator in the same manner as Hunley.


    Or maybe as the CSS Saint Patrick was used during the closing of the war. Even after the fall of Mobile Confederates still controlled Fort Blakely and Spanish Fort. The submarine Saint Patrick had been built in 1864 by Irish immigrant John Halligan originally for similar war usage as the more famous Confederate sub (Hunley). But, according to Mark Ragan’s Submarine Warfare in the Civil War, as the war was coming to a close the Confederates used the St. Patrick to resupply Spanish Fort.


    We’re looking at a fictionalized history in Oyster War. The Alligator was real and the Oyster Wars actually did happen. But Mr. Towle’s comic is a fictionalized history so he can have Alligator be more seaworthy if he wants. So if it’s more seaworthy, it would have made the best blockade runner.

  12. Three Steps Over Japan

    Three Steps Over Japan said, about 1 year ago

    “This is what I was wondering about, why they wouldn’t have come up with the idea of using Alligator in the same manner as Hunley.”

    As you say, Ben’s maintaining a certain level of historical accuracy, so we have to have a reason for why the Alligator still exists while everyone else believes it to be sunk. Now, as to why our good Commander chose to hide it rather than make use of it right away – he didn’t get the chance to, and only two men knew of it’s continued existence, so the rest of the Confederate Army couldn’t use it, either.

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