Over the Hedge by T Lewis and Michael Fry

Over the Hedge

Comments (14) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. rayannina

    rayannina said, almost 5 years ago

    Dostoyevsky: the anti-mice.

  2. Nabuquduriuzhur

    Nabuquduriuzhur said, almost 5 years ago

    Three? They’ve multiplied already?

  3. ChukLitl

    ChukLitl GoComics PRO Member said, almost 5 years ago

    I’ve heard that it’s even worse in the original Russian. The imagery is excruciating because the winters are long. It is definitively an art form, & as such is not suitable to all audiences. If it’s easy to like it’s amusement, not art.

  4. APersonOfInterest

    APersonOfInterest said, almost 5 years ago

    @ChukLitl

    The idea that great literature must be difficult to understand and “like” is just not true.

  5. bdaverin

    bdaverin said, almost 5 years ago

    @ChukLitl

    A former co-worker of mine is equally fluent in Russian and English. We talked about Russian literature sometime. She noted that Russian has more ways to be dark, sad, depressed, and morbid than English to degrees that cannot be readily translated. What to us is stultifying in translation is richly textured to them.

  6. bdaverin

    bdaverin said, almost 5 years ago

    @ChukLitl

    But I so strongly disagree with your definition of art. Michelangelo is easy to like. How is his work mere amusement?

  7. Kydex29

    Kydex29 said, almost 5 years ago

    I’m an American mutt, but I speak fluent Russian. Dostoyevski is certainly not a feel-good writer, but neither is he morbid. He delves deep into the human psyche, and does so with a palpable love for people and for God, rather than glorying in his own dark philosophy like some writers. The older translations were stilted because they were poor translations, not because of cultural differences. Try the most recent translations by Pevear and Volokhonsky.

  8. Tom Flapwell

    Tom Flapwell said, almost 5 years ago

    Kinda surprised he didn’t use “War and Peace” instead. Also, would Hammy have enjoyed it?

  9. fritzoid

    fritzoid GoComics PRO Member said, almost 5 years ago

    Any of you Russian readers read Pasternak’s translation of “Hamlet”? It’s supposed to be outstanding, but my rooskie yazhikh isn’t nearly good enough to tackle it. Kozintzev’s 1964 film uses the Pasternak translation, but when I play the DVD with English subtitles it just gives me Shakespeare’s words. There are times when I can tell they’re speaking verse, but so many of Hamlet’s lines are puns that I’m highly intrigued by how Pasternak might have dealt with them…

  10. fry300

    fry300 said, almost 5 years ago

    My, our audience is quite sophisticated. I will adjust accordingly. Or not. – mike

  11. Gibbon Man

    Gibbon Man said, almost 5 years ago

    @Tom Flapwell

    Squirrels don’t live long enough to get through War & Peace.

  12. Nabuquduriuzhur

    Nabuquduriuzhur said, almost 5 years ago

    He didn’t read “Of Mice and M—er, Squirrels?”
    I’ve some reeeaaaaly bad memories associated with Russian class. Made the Oregonian, back when it was a real paper, put it that way.

  13. Marcia Hernandez

    Marcia Hernandez said, almost 5 years ago

    Gogol literally had a nose going into a tavern. If the simplified, highly atmospheric Taman that´s in Russian-English readers were read to Hammy, his head mice would have been riveted. Thanks to Kydex29 for the reference. Thanks to Hammy for inspiring all this.

  14. Nabuquduriuzhur

    Nabuquduriuzhur said, almost 5 years ago

    We just read simple stuff like Taman. All I remember now is that everyone was out to get the Russian officer in question…

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