Origins of the Sunday Comics by Peter Maresca

Origins of the Sunday Comics

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  1. davidf42

    davidf42 said, almost 3 years ago

    “Lacked the humor” is right.

  2. deskmandmna

    deskmandmna GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    Some very high level draftsmanship here at least.

  3. dheine1971

    dheine1971 said, almost 3 years ago

    Christmas at the end of July.

  4. Richard

    Richard GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    Remember this was the competitor to the original draw by Outcault. Draw by his so called rival Luk.
    The newspaper wars were raging at the time. Copyright laws were not well enforced back then. The artist normally did not have “ownership” of his works like today. The newspaper owned them and could do whatever they liked. Look at the differences and you can tell. Luk was no where near as funny as Outcault.

  5. Zuhlamon

    Zuhlamon GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    ‘wonder how long it took to ink and color this drawing? It’s a nightmare for the ADHD folks.

  6. Richard

    Richard GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    @Zuhlamon

    Back then they only had a week. Came out every Sunday.

  7. Attila The Voice!

    Attila The Voice! said, almost 3 years ago

    This really scares me!

  8. katina.cooper

    katina.cooper said, almost 3 years ago

    They used XMAS in 1896? If I saw the way they thought about Christmas in that paper, I’d never buy it again.

  9. capndunzzl

    capndunzzl said, almost 3 years ago

    …this seems inappropriate.

  10. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    @katina.cooper

    It saves space and is obviously not a recent idea.

  11. joe-b-cool

    joe-b-cool GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    @katina.cooper

    Xmas is a common abbreviation of the word Christmas . It is sometimes pronounced /ˈɛksməs/, but it, and variants such as Xtemass, originated as handwriting abbreviations for the typical pronunciation /ˈkrɪsməs/. The “-mas” part is from the Latin-derived Old English word for Mass,1 while the “X” comes from the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the Greek word Χριστός which comes into English as “Christ”.2

    There is a common misconception that the word Xmas stems from a secular attempt to remove the religious tradition from Christmas3 by taking the “Christ” out of “Christmas”, but its use dates back to the 16th century
    from Wikipedia.

  12. Richard

    Richard GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    @joe-b-cool

    Right you are. The symbol is the cross being carried to the moment. A cross turned on its side is an X. It’s the way it was explained to me a very long time ago.

  13. dawnsfire

    dawnsfire said, almost 3 years ago

    I never could get into the Yellow Kid, no matter who drew him.

  14. BRI-NO-MITE!!

    BRI-NO-MITE!! GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    @joe-b-cool

    I move that we officially change the name of the holiday to Xmas, an abbreviation for eXcessive MAterialiSm.

  15. Benjamin Scott

    Benjamin Scott said, almost 3 years ago

    So this is what comics looked like just over 100 years ago? Wow…cartoonists back then really lacked humor. At least they had decent art, but honestly…I don’t care about quality as much as I do humor.

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