Nick Anderson by Nick Anderson

Nick Anderson

Comments (14) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. SteepBumps

    SteepBumps said, about 1 year ago

    Nailed it.

  2. D-squared

    D-squared said, about 1 year ago

    Oh yeah, Gov Oops, THAT’S what’s outrageous.

  3. masterskrain

    masterskrain GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    AWWW! Governor Goodhair got his panties in a wad!
    And this doofus wanted to be President??

  4. Rad-ish

    Rad-ish GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    The current Ohman cartoon is the one in question.
    http://www.gocomics.com/jackohman

  5. Kylop

    Kylop said, about 1 year ago

    His supporters will show up soon to defend him

  6. Dr Lou

    Dr Lou GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    Perry’s press parasite is going to have to work overtime to keep up his false moral indignation…anything but actually addressing the problems he has created.

  7. mickey1339

    mickey1339 GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    I think this is a perfect example of enforce the existing laws because that’s what caused the problem (as I understand it). They were above safe levels of storage in this facility. So maybe beef up regulators to inspect and enforce the law?

  8. I Play One On TV

    I Play One On TV said, about 1 year ago

    @mickey1339

    “So maybe beef up regulators to inspect and enforce the law?”

    No doubt. I don’t see anyone posting about how regulations are just intrusive government job-killers. I guess those people have the day off.

    I guess I’m old-fashioned. I always thought that if someone paid me to do a job, I was actually expected to do it. It’s not like there aren’t available workers…if these people won’t do their jobs, maybe we should replace them with people who will.

  9. Respectful Troll

    Respectful Troll said, about 1 year ago

    Nearly 180 people have been killed in grain-tower entrapments at federally regulated facilities since 1984, records show. Employers were issued a total of $9.2 million in fines, though regulators later reduced the penalties overall by 59%.
    ^
    http://www.mlive.com/news/kalamazoo/index.ssf/2013/04/protestors_gather_in_oppositio.html
    Failure to regulate and inspect a tar sands oil pipe line that while repaired and operational, still has not restored the river to what it was before the incident.
    ^
    http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Energy-Resources/2013/04/30/Citizen-group-sees-toxic-oil-soup-in-Arkansas/UPI-72131367321661/
    Failure to learn from the Kalamazoo River spill makes an entire community ill and forces them to move to shelters and hotels. Exxon uses political clout to keep reporters from “trespassing” in nearby wetlands or even flying over the area in aircraft.
    ^
    http://www.wvgazette.com/News/201304180082
    This link reminds us of the 29 men killed because Massey Mines thought that fines were part of their cost of doing business. It also shows how a Judge who got his position from donations by coal companies ruled in favor of the coal company three times.
    ^
    I can add the ongoing BP spill info, and links to pictures of rivers where factories are failing to clean water before it gets to the river and lakes. There are sludge pits that have overflowed, and there are still way too many questions about the chemicals used in fracking. Remember the plant last year that was combining medicines in unsterile and unsafe conditions?
    ^
    These things cost the government money, and cause people to die or suffer life long disabilities.. Your tax dollars are being used, inefficiently, to clean up after the mistakes of wealthy business men or more frighteningly, almost bankrupt businesses.
    The only answer is INTELLIGENT regulation written by experts that will protect life and prevent the kind of needless loss of life and habitat we have seen from the examples I listed above. We can not allow lobbyists to put jobs in front of safety. No one will be working at the fertilizer plant for years. Who will replace the police and firemen killed?
    More than anything else…
    Why is it that so many Americans are willing tolerate these needless disasters, the losses to life, quality of life, family members, communities, and the very land and water upon which the people depend, until that American is the one effected.
    ^
    Gov. Perry is proud of his record of bringing hardship and suffering to communities in other states. Just as Mexico took jobs from Detroit, Texas has bribed businesses into moving to Texas. Texas will not make much from those businesses for the first few years because of the concessions made in tax breaks and protections from “interference”. He will complain about the US gov’t spending too much in taxes on the ‘freeloaders’ whose jobs went to Texas and who are now on unemployment or struggling to fine work since their job left before their pensions could kick in.
    ^
    No one should have to endure what happened in West Texas, or in Mayflower, Ark, or in the Coal mines of West Virginia, or the Gulf of Mexico, etc, etc, etc.
    But if you don’t stop yelling at each other, and start yelling at the people who are able to make the changes, it is only a matter of time before YOUR town is in the news because a business has killed your neighbors, or poisoned your environment in the name of jobs and money and antiregulation. I don’t want you folks to be hurt like that.
    Respectfully,
    & Angrily,
    C.

  10. Darren Blair

    Darren Blair said, about 1 year ago

    @Respectful Troll

    Contrary to popular belief, a lot of people have come to Texas quite willingly over the past several years. Many of them have come from California in the hopes of escaping that state’s legal morass.
    []
    What morass?
    []
    The Economist (http://www.economist.com/node/18712862) gives us a case study in one such situation, a father / daughter team of immigrants who tried to start a business making and selling yogurt; they were forced to shut down after being caught between two different California state agencies that maintained contradictory regulations which they were too small to afford the cost of satisfying.
    []
    So no, Perry hasn’t exactly been bribing people. All he had to do was dust off the “welcome” mat and they came of their own accord.

  11. Darren Blair

    Darren Blair said, about 1 year ago

    @mickey1339

    It’s my understanding that while the federal government set the minimum standards regulations, they failed to provide an adequate reporting method for companies like the fertilizer plant; even if the owners wanted to be in compliance with federal law, they still couldn’t as there was no way of knowing who to file their reports with.
    []
    Furthermore, I also understand that the last time anyone from any level of government – federal, state, or local – inspected the plant was some time around 2006; how could a plant like that go a full seven years without anyone checking it out?

  12. Respectful Troll

    Respectful Troll said, about 1 year ago

    Just a quick addition…
    in 2011, 4609 Americans lost their lives in on the job accidents. It has been harder to find out how many of those deaths were unnecessary. I also haven’t found a number for those injured that same year. Mickey and Ahab are right.
    ^
    @ Darren Blair – neither of us are ‘wrong’. However, even with the truth lying in the space between your comment and mine, ANY business Texas took from New York, Indiana, Michigan, California, etc etc, took income from communities and set up a pattern in which businesses move from one state to another in search of the best deal. People and communities have become pawns in the game between politicians and corporations.
    There are MANY stupid regulations on the books. That is why people like myself and Mickey and others have called for a thourough auditing of these rules to prevent cases like the one you mentioned, or like the little girl who couldn’t have a lemonade stand in front of her house because of regs. A fertalizer plant goes uninspected for over 20 years, but a little girl gets shut down. Yes… we need intelligent regulation. But still, for states to raid states and then decry gov’t assistance for those harmed by job losses and worse is obscene.
    I find this practice offensive and un-American. A United States doesn’t practice that unity by backstabbing sister states.
    Money is how we common folks trade services for what we need. But for the very powerful, it’s how they keep score. And WE are losing.
    Respectfully,
    C.

  13. D-squared

    D-squared said, about 1 year ago

    @rightisright

    Like when the current Gov of Florida perpetrates such fraud?

  14. Respectful Troll

    Respectful Troll said, about 1 year ago

    @rightisright

    The libs I know want oversight and intelligent and effective enforcement of appropriate regulation. I do not know anyone who would not support intelligent audting of medicare. Libs are upset that money is being wasted and people are being defrauded and abused.
    ^
    It is usually from conservatives that i hear the most about “self regulation” of corporations and intrusive inspections by the gov’t. Companies would do better with LESS regulation we’re told.
    ^
    No one wants to give the money away, but they don’t want it to be held into perpetuity either.
    ^
    If you haven’t seen the many postings calling for more inspection and streamlining the rules and regulations to make them effective, then you have not been paying attention.
    ^
    We have to work together to stop lobbyists from writing loopholes that permit waste and fraud into legislation and we need more people making sure that those getting aid actually are using it properly.
    It sometimes takes money to make money and to protect money.
    Respectfully,
    C.

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