Mike Luckovich by Mike Luckovich

Mike Luckovich

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  1. Bruce4671

    Bruce4671 GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2011/03/01/top-10-most-dangerous-jobs/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sportspeople_who_died_during_their_careers

    http://www.cnn.com/2012/12/04/health/football-brain-disease

    Ok fine. Are we going to ban football now? How about all the other dangerous jobs? Please look at the top ten list, football isn’t there. But it IS a dangerous profession.

    Football is also lucrative. It creates a BUNCH of jobs.

    Haven’t we always know that being a “gladiator” can kill you?

  2. The Wolf In Your Midst

    The Wolf In Your Midst GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    @Bruce4671

    We shouldn’t have to ban football. We should be too revolted by it to watch a single minute of play. But tribalistic violence- watching “us” hurt “them”- is the underpinning of American society.
    We should at least be honest enough with ourselves to say “Yeah, we’re barbarians; we pay young men millions of dollars to destroy each other on a field for our amusement, rather than educate them to advance us as a species”.

  3. Mhic Dhu Ghaill

    Mhic Dhu Ghaill GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    Article in AUTOWEEK , developer of racing helmets and HANS device turning to football/lacross etc…a fix is possible. Maybe the best would to remove all padding like rugby and aussie foot ball.

  4. Rockngolfer

    Rockngolfer said, about 1 year ago

    There is a new fabric cap that has wires and sensors that can be plugged into a usb port. When the players helmet takes a hit, you plug the cap into a computer to see a green, yellow, or red indicator to determine if the player should continue the game or be checked out by a doctor before playing again.

  5. Rockngolfer

    Rockngolfer said, about 1 year ago

    Hmm. There are several companies working on various systems to put sensors in helmets. Some cost upward of $1,000. Hope this doesn’t go like the Beta-VCR or the Blu-ray and other format wars where consumers lose a lot of money.

  6. braindead08

    braindead08 GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    ^ If the indicator comes up red, and there is a penalty, either live or upon further review, the hitter should be out of the game for as long as the injured player is out — without salary for the pros.
    -
    You would see the game change in a hurry.

  7. Rockngolfer

    Rockngolfer said, about 1 year ago

    Some of the rule changes that went into effect (last year?) like moving the kickofff up, calling a penalty for hitting with the helmet, and automatic review of some plays may have helped some.
    I think that they can make the game exciting without hauling someone off the field every few minutes.

  8. hippogriff

    hippogriff said, about 1 year ago

    Mhic Dhu Ghaill: Do any readers have comparative figures on brain injuries in US football versus more open movement games like Canadian football, rugby (at least the scrum starts in contact), Australian rules, etc.?
    .
    braindead08: Good in theory, but “the hitter” is just the last in a long series of hitters. It is the cumulative effect that is what does the damage.

  9. Bandusia15

    Bandusia15 said, about 1 year ago

    @hippogriff

    Australian Rules doesn’t seem to have any brain injuries despite the players not wearing helmets. Intelligent men, some with university degrees have played the game, become fathers and gone on to become football coaches, all without brain injury.

  10. echoraven

    echoraven said, about 1 year ago

    @The Wolf In Your Midst

    Lots of people have taken some smart pills today. Well said!

  11. dtroutma

    dtroutma GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    Mhic: Simpson is working on the issue indeed, and the g-forces from high speed collisions aren’t any greater, damage wise, than the hits in football.


    But, looking at the lesser number of brain injuries in Rugby, soccer, and other “contact” sports, my question has long been, studying the physics and biology/physiology, isn’t it possible that all that “padding” that ENCOURAGES increased impact velocities, and angles of attack, and further injuries. Add in the extreme mass of the players, and agian, physics says F-ma, and the end result is more injuries.


    The real tragedy is high school players, and even younger, receiving these injuries during their growth years, and the head injuries are but part of the crippling, life-long injuries received. Orthopedists also see permanent damage, all the time.

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