Matt Bors by Matt Bors

Matt Bors

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  1. Respectful Troll

    Respectful Troll said, almost 3 years ago

    I have to admit I don’t recognize either of the names you use, Gore Bane. Link?
    And are you sure you don’t mean you can’t change something without observing it first?
    One thing dems and reps do have in common, neither trust the gov’t anymore.
    Easily confused,
    C.

  2. BrassOrchid

    BrassOrchid GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    Schrodinger is appropriate. You don’t know if your privacy has been violated until you look. And you cannot actually look, so one may reasonably presume that they have no privacy. So, if you want to keep your cat, don’t put it in a box with a poison pellet and rely on probability by oversight.

  3. emptc12

    emptc12 said, almost 3 years ago

    It’s the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, Schroedinger’s Cat Paradox. Both relate to quantum theory, the next stage of physics after Einstein. You might read EINSTEIN’S COSMOS, by Michio Kaku, that explains the fundamentals of both relativity and quantum theory. Very well written and relatively (pun intended) easy to read.

  4. mikefive

    mikefive said, almost 3 years ago

    11 FISC judges rubber stamped 1,855 warrants in 2012 (none denied). The number of warrants has been going up by 100 to 200 per year since 2001 along with 15,229 National Security Letters authorized by various and sundry Supervising Special Agents. “Ted Blanchard” (or his office) would be hard pressed to review five warrants a day. This sounds more like a sop for the masses than an effective way to maintain individual privacy. More effective would be to fire the rubber stamps in judges robes and hire judges that will comply with the Constitution and not kowtow to the Justice Department. Sticking another layer of bureaucracy into the warrant process could delay the issuing of a warrant at a critical time.

  5. Jase99

    Jase99 GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    I think he’s referring to Schrodinger’s cat. The cat exists in both states until you look. In this case Ted is both successful and unsuccessful until we are allowed to look at the results.

  6. ossiningaling

    ossiningaling said, almost 3 years ago

    and @BrassOrchid – thanks for elevating the intellectual discussion. Now excuse me while I go crack open a book!

  7. Respectful Troll

    Respectful Troll said, almost 3 years ago

    @mikefive

    Thank you for another well stated comment, M5.
    @ Adrian Snare – Over the last 12 years, my trust in gov’t has steadily declined. The “Ends justify the Means” attitude in the Executive & Legislative Branches, combined with the SCOTUS’s conservatives refusing to recluse themselves on cases where I saw conflict of interest, conflicts that brought us Citizen’s United among other decisions I see as flawed, has increased my cynicism.
    If one studies history, there are many instances in which the failures of previous gov’ts are being paralleled by our gov’t. From Rome to 1930’s Germany, our leaders are unable or unwilling to learn from the past. I wish Mickey1339 was still posting. He could present these ideas much better than I.
    Adrian, Eisenhower warned America that it would take an informed and educated electorate to stand up to the Military Industrial complex. His draft of that speech included Congress. The media and our schools no longer educate us and most people are so overworked and stressed out, they have no energy to seek information and rely on those they want to trust, even when they shouldn’t.
    With 42% of retiring Congressmen moving into lobbying jobs and 50% of Senators, it is hard to believe any of these plutocrats care about Americans.
    I haven’t watched a single episode of Breaking Bad. Meth has harmed to many relatives of mine in poor parts of Carolina and Mississippi. This video is all I can really add.
    ^
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpoEmlxUPeQ
    ^
    I wish I could be more upbeat, Mr. Snare.
    Sadly,
    C.

  8. The Wolf In Your Midst

    The Wolf In Your Midst said, almost 3 years ago

    @Respectful Troll

    The percentages you quote explain everything that’s wrong with the system. Except for a few wide-eyed (and extremely persistent) idealists, politics no longer has anything to do with serving the public’s interests- it’s an onramp to the yellow-brick (or should I say goldbrick?) road, peddling influence in exchange for campaign funds… and once a politician retires (or, against all gerrymandered odds, is ousted by a challenger), they can look forward to a lifetime of free healthcare and a cushy job at a corporate think-tank of their choice.
    Of course, the likes of you and I aren’t welcome to this decadent little dance. After all, it’s not like we matter- we’re just citizens!

  9. emptc12

    emptc12 said, almost 3 years ago

    @Respectful Troll

    It’s ironic and weird that not only have people forgotten history, they even seem to have forgotten they can learn anything from history. Willful ignorance! It seems increasingly to change so quickly in externals such as clothing and technology from generation to generation that some seem to forget that people themselves haven’t changed much and societal interaction on every level repeats over and over.
    .
    The oldest thing I’ve read is the epic of Gilgamesh, and I can relate elements of it to modern times. The same thing with ancient Greek and Roman writings, and those from Medieval, Renaissance, and the Enlightenment. They are fascinating in good translations. Amazing how much of that knowledge is available today, and the valuable observations and advice contained therein are ignored.
    .
    As I’ve written before, many of the things we as a society are going through today seem to parallel what happened in the first decades of the 20th century: wars, plutocrats, labor problems, joblessness, economic stagnation, depression.

  10. Stipple

    Stipple said, almost 3 years ago

    @emptc12

    I understand Gilgamesh was the first “story” found and translated. Records of goods traded was the basis of writing.
    .
    But the point is that mankind has not changed a single iota since that book was written at the dawn of recorded history.
    .
    I personally find expecting change in mankind now is rather silly, why would the pattern of the last 7500 years change.
    .
    Agriculture created society and it has been run unchanged since then, America will fall just like the others before.
    .
    Men are men, always will be.

  11. BrassOrchid

    BrassOrchid GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    @Stipple

    Well, that is, in all likely probability, the last thing I should want to hear, me treading the marketplace with my wheel-barrow filled with past-expiration-date hope and change for sale, cheap. I may have to fall back on my magic beans business. Everybody wants to buy a too-big-to-fail castle in the sky.

  12. BrassOrchid

    BrassOrchid GoComics PRO Member said, almost 3 years ago

    @emptc12

    Heisenberg relates to certainty of particles, such as electrons, regarding two states, such as position and motion. If you know where it is, you cannot know its direction or energetic level, while if you know its direction or energetic level, then you cannot know where it is. Schrodinger extends this to probability and branching of reality into separate states by observation interacting with, but not determinant of, which reality is prevalent. This is all supported by Bell’s Theorem, which says that since it is the only explanation we have that allows any measure of reproducible predictability, that it must be the best one available. Einstein would maintain that the theory is incomplete because it cannot account for those things considered uncertain, which, in a complete theory, should be accounted for and not left to chance, being calculated to 100% accuracy and not some fraction thereof.

  13. emptc12

    emptc12 said, almost 3 years ago

    @Stipple

    I think you and I would agree with Herbert Butterfield in “The Whig Interpretation of History” that there is no inevitable positivism in the progression of human culture.
    .
    While I believe that lessons can be learned from past history, I don’t think there are one-to-one correspondences as in a code to predict and guide the future, as The Foundation’s Harry Seldon did with “Psychohistory.” We can through knowledge of history make fewer mistakes, but there will always be mistakes nonetheless. It’s in our nature. We are natural, not preternatural.
    .
    We are part of Earthly evolution, and the present scientific view of evolution is that it does not lead to Man as its apex. Man is only a branch of many branches, and not the culmination. Actually, I think the humanity will prune itself before too long and not “always will be.”
    .
    As always, I’m a cheerful pessimist.

  14. emptc12

    emptc12 said, almost 3 years ago

    @BrassOrchid

    From what I read, poor Einstein relied on brilliant physical conceptions to express and develop his theories; and when subsequent theories became so abstruse as to rely on pure mathematics, he was at a loss to proceed or refute his critics. What type of brilliant minds can deal with all of this and not lose a human grounding? What’s next?
    .
    Will quantum computer minds break through to the next levels? I’m beginning to bloviate, and will stop here. It’s fun to speculate, isn’t it?

  15. mikefive

    mikefive said, almost 3 years ago

    @emptc12

    “Will quantum computer minds break through to the next levels?”

    With all of the states that qubits can be in at the same time, If the next levels are attained, will the quantum computer be the most schizophrenic entity to ever exist?

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