Maria's Day by John Zakour and Scott Roberts

Maria's Day

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  1. Neo Stryder

    Neo Stryder said, about 1 year ago

    “Math Made Hard”?, as if not were hard enough, now they have an expert level?

  2. geopardy

    geopardy said, about 1 year ago

    It’s actually the “old” math that has one correct answer to a problem, instead of a range of acceptable answers.

  3. Thomas Scott Roberts

    Thomas Scott Roberts GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    The ‘new’ math of the 60’s hit when I was in third gradeWe had just had our standard math books- the ones the school had used for years- for maybe a week, when we were told to turn them in, and the new books were handed out. America’s paranoid rush to keep up with the USSR, after Sputnik, caused this sudden switch. The ill conceived plan was to create an entire generation of math geniuses by having a system designed by math geniuses. The detail they all overlooked was that geniuses don’t know how to explain things to people who are not at their level. We were not all Sheldon Cooper. From that day on, math was a baffling, byzantine mystery to me.

  4. Thomas Scott Roberts

    Thomas Scott Roberts GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    @Neo Stryder

    I added the title, in memory of my difficulties with math.

  5. Redkaycei Repoc

    Redkaycei Repoc said, about 1 year ago

    @Thomas Scott Roberts

    I remember the ‘new’ math, they introduced it in my 6th grade year. I had A’s and B’s in math in elementary school and then with the move to JR High was introduced to ‘new’ math. My grades were terrible with the new system, by the time I was in the last year of JR High (8th grade) we were back to the traditional system and I went on to doing ok in High School with two years of Algebra, a year of geometry and one of Trig.

  6. Thomas Scott Roberts

    Thomas Scott Roberts GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    I don’t remember them going back in my school. I just remember never doing well in math after the switch. There’s no shortcut to creating geniuses. That occurs naturally, and you are one or you’re not. People don’t think of proficiency with numbers as being a talent, because it’s not the arts or sports. So we’re all ‘supposed’ to be equally good at handling figures and doing business…even figuring our taxes… and if you’re not, it’s assumed that you’re just not trying.

  7. lightenup

    lightenup GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    And they just switched methods here again. My 5th grader started learning multiplication in 2nd grade (basics) and a lot in 3rd grade. While my 3rd grader has just started the basics (x0 and x1). They claim that they’re going more in depth and showing them many different ways of doing the same problem, but I think it’s ridiculous. So they go to a math tutor on the side so they will feel comfortable with numbers and not be bored or overwhelmed.

  8. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, about 1 year ago

    @Thomas Scott Roberts

    Only math geniuses under stood it. Bad idea. I was the opposite of a math genius. WE do exist. We just can’t get even the easy stuff without great effort. It happens, blame the genes.

  9. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, about 1 year ago

    @Thomas Scott Roberts

    Just as not everyone is an artist beyond school age the same is with math and music. I was good in drawing bad in math. So I never made it to trigonometry.

  10. Thomas Scott Roberts

    Thomas Scott Roberts GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    It’s overreaching to try to teach kids multiple way of doing things they’re only just learning to do at all. It could well be counterproductive. Let them get one way right, and let them feel confident in it. That’s better than having them struggle with three or four ways. We’ve had generations to get education right, but we just can’t stop second guessing every method, including the ones that actually work. Perhaps too many people want to be the genius who came up with the better way.

  11. rekam

    rekam GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    I had enough trouble with “old” math and when i was in junior college had to take a “new” math class as part of the curriculum for teaching. Oy!

  12. comicsssfan

    comicsssfan said, about 1 year ago

    That’s a funny book title but be glad they have a math textbook to use. In my schools we never had a book for any of the math classes that I was in. But I could have been placed in bad math classes to save money. Our sports programs had the finest equipment though.

  13. comicsssfan

    comicsssfan said, about 1 year ago

    @Thomas Scott Roberts

    “We’ve had generations to get education right, but we just can’t stop second guessing every method, including the ones that actually work. Perhaps too many people want to be the genius who came up with the better way.”

    I’m reading Diane Ravitch, who was an assistant secretary of education. She says they had it right in the “1920s and 1940s.” She didn’t explain the 1930s. And she says a few charter schools who follow the old days are working great. I don’t think charter schools have sports even now, and they weren’t that interested in sports in the 1920s. They also valued books back then.

  14. comicsssfan

    comicsssfan said, about 1 year ago

    What people don’t realize about math is that there can’t be any gaps in your knowledge of it to go to the next step. The elementary teachers don’t teach it thoroughly enough because they aren’t comfortable with it themselves. Then in middle school it’s time for sports, which gets in the way of catching up on math. And my middle school math teachers were not interested in teaching at all. Then in high school the teachers are good but kids are not prepared. Diane Ravitch says that the problem is with our elementary and middle schools. Our high schools are good.

  15. Neo Stryder

    Neo Stryder said, about 1 year ago

    Me and a friend has been reading her since the beginning, and we agree she’s becoming less funnier than before.

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