Kevin Kallaugher by Kevin Kallaugher

Kevin KallaugherNo Zoom

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  1. Respectful Troll

    Respectful Troll said, over 1 year ago

    While Mr. Kallaugher’s art is great and I love the gist of his message, placing ALL blame on the right is unhelpful, and frankly, untrue. Mr. Limbaugh and Murdoch’s television lobby aside, in the final panel, Uncle Sam should be talking to an elephant AND a donkey whose answer is in one voice. Uncle Sam is not a democrat or a republican, but has become a victim of the partisan machinations of both parties.
    Respectfully,
    C.

  2. Gary Kleppe

    Gary Kleppe said, over 1 year ago

    @Respectful Troll

    Rubbish. The cartoon is absolutely right. It’s the Republicans who’ve been gerrymandering state maps to ridiculous degrees, and it’s the Republicans whose “my way or the highway” approach has completely gummed up the machinery of government.

  3. mikefive

    mikefive said, over 1 year ago

    @Gary Kleppe

    I think that you are forgetting that Harry Reid does a little bit of that “my way or the highway” thing, too.

    Although I’m no a fan of gerrymandering in order to get political majorities established, it must be noted that some minorities would not have appropriate representation without gerrymandering.

  4. Respectful Troll

    Respectful Troll said, over 1 year ago

    @David

    The second panel plainly give equal blame to the parties for gerrymandering, David. I failed to mention that, just as Gary Kleppe’s message fails to mention that gerrymandering is practice as old as our nation. While Gary and I might be in agreement as to the rigidity of the GOP over the last 8 years, and the redmapping tactics of the last 4 years, seeing both the elephant and Uncle Sam bowed under the weight of the bugs reminded me of opportunities lost by Ms. Pelosi in 2009 through sheer arrogance in her desire to keep promises to the liberal fringe. If the carpet from which the fabric of our nation is woven is to really survive, both parties have to trim the fringes and tighten the hems. As mikefive says, Mr. Reid has arrogance issues as well. If both parties had chosen new leadership after the recent elections, the dynamic between the parties might be different.
    ^
    Beyond that, I have no disagreement with your well stated comment which I appreciate for the gaps you fill and the tone you bring.
    Respectfully,
    C.

  5. ossiningaling

    ossiningaling said, over 1 year ago

    @Respectful Troll

    Yes, gerrymandering is an age-old custom used by both parties for political gain. But the point of this cartoon is that it has gotten to a state where extreme views have taken hold to the detriment of the country. That is, nothing will get done while these obstructionists are in play.

  6. Respectful Troll

    Respectful Troll said, over 1 year ago

    @David

    Hello David,
    Bill has great panelists but is a legend in his own mind. If I had HBO, I’d watch him for the guests. As the son of a woman who would have been an executive in the 60’s and 70’s if not for the “glass ceiling”, and the father of two daughters – one a GS12, the other a major, I have had a long interest in the way our society maintains its double standard for women. I respect confidence, resolve, and – in executives – constructive criticism and discipline.
    In politicians, I expect- even demand- diplomacy.
    ^
    Geo. Washington’s warning about parties is that it would create tribal attitudes that would cause big problems to rise from small and petty grievances. Ms. Pelosi has been in office long enough to know the environment that has existed since the Gingrich revolution. That’s when I first noticed the move towards hatefulness we see now.
    ^
    Mr. Obama’s election could have been a watershed moment and opportunity to mend bridges savaged by they previous 12 years, but I heard her in interviews and read some of her words while she was Speaker and she was neither politic or diplomatic
    ^.
    I can ignore Maher’s arrogance. He’s an entertainer, but our leaders have to lead, and you can’t build consensus with overconfidence and harsh rhetoric
    ^.
    I appreciate your reply and as you point out, it is a matter of how one looks at it. I wish I had seen a better perspective in her perspective back in 2009.
    Respectfully,
    C.

  7. Respectful Troll

    Respectful Troll said, over 1 year ago

    @David

    No problem David, I already agreed to disagree. But I’m curious on which ‘team’ you believe Ms. Pelosi plays? While history has shown she reluctantly supported legislation under Mr. Bush(Dems have historically been more willing to compromise than the Rs), once Mr. Obama came into office under a House majority and a ‘technical’ majority in the senate, she seemed harsh in her interviews towards the minorities. The GOP used a record number of ‘technical’ filibusters and the legal wrangling that kept Al Franken from taking his seat until just before the 2010 elections to block every piece of legislation that came their way. That said, I feel the Dem leadership missed a chance to make something good happen.
    You are a very good commentator, David, and please don’t take my comments to be anything more than commentary on the situation from my personal viewpoint. It in no way detracts from your own perspective which may well be more realistic than my own.
    Respectfully,
    C.

  8. william sharpe

    william sharpe said, over 1 year ago

    I see the problem as too many politicians and a real shortage of statesmen. Everybody is fighting to get an advantage and nobody seems interested in doing what’s good for our nation. I would like to see some people in power who have no chance of reelection and their only legacy to be what they did good for the country!

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