JumpStart by Robb Armstrong

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  1. ReneTray

    ReneTray said, about 2 years ago

    Yes on this story.

    WWII needed copper for war effort.

  2. simpsonfan2

    simpsonfan2 said, about 2 years ago

    @ReneTray

    And they also changed the composition of the nickel too.

  3. SCOTTtheBADGER

    SCOTTtheBADGER said, about 2 years ago

    Made them out of worn out ammo boxes, I am told.

  4. CFinFL

    CFinFL said, about 2 years ago

    Was there a real shortage of copper, or just a contrived one for psychological reasons to boost the publics feelings for supporting the war. I worked with a man who claimed to have helped destroy tons of then rationed butter during the war, for that very reason.

  5. Brightspot60

    Brightspot60 said, about 2 years ago

    The copper shortage was probably real. Lots of the ‘sinews of war’[tanks, ships, aircraft, trucks, etc.] require electrical wiring; then, there’s brass[copper and zinc] for ammunition. So there probably WAS a copper shortage.

  6. AshburnStadium

    AshburnStadium said, about 2 years ago

    @Brightspot60

    The Pennsylvania Railroad was once the most-electrified railroad in America.
    They couldn’t even get the copper to make more of their famous GG1 locomotives, which were one of the greatest electric locomotives that were ever built. 138 were built between 1934-1943 (the last year for the GG1 was also the year of the steel penny).
    And, of course, they couldn’t get more copper to extend their electric lines west of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The end of the electrification at Harrisburg exists to this day under Amtrak.

  7. Nun'Ya Bidness

    Nun'Ya Bidness said, about 2 years ago

    @CFinFL

    Reminds me of the contrived ‘Gas Shortage’ of the 70’s!

  8. gmforde

    gmforde said, about 2 years ago

    There was a real shortage of copper. The price skyrocketed to a point where the mint decided that it was cheaper to add some zinc and aluminum to it. The only copper left at this point is the color. Now they want to eliminate the penny altogether to “save” more money. The “gas shortage” of the 1970s was contrived. It was an embargo against the Arabs for what I don’t remember. Now Pres. Jimmy Carter is in love with them. Go figure that one out.

  9. david_42

    david_42 said, about 2 years ago

    @gmforde

    Even zinc pennies cost over two cents each to make, the nickel is over 11 cents. People really need to let go of the idea that fiat money has value.

  10. hippogriff

    hippogriff said, about 2 years ago

    gmforde: More oil was shipped from Persian Gulf ports to the US during the “Arab oil boycott” than the same period the year before. (Lloyds Shipping Gazette annual summary). The joke at the time that it would end when all storage capacity was full, was apparently correct, it was being stored in mothballed USN fleet tankers. Yet Canada, which was not boycotted, could only get OPEC oil from Indonesia, Nigeria, and Venezuela, none of which were “Arab” (and at that time, eastern Canada could not get Alberta oil because of the “Sarnia Gap”, now connected).

  11. flyintheweb

    flyintheweb said, about 2 years ago

    find a copper 1943 penny that is worth SERIOUS money (as in 6 figures). Think the 1944 were made from shell casings or something, too – but they were copper

  12. simpsonfan2

    simpsonfan2 said, about 2 years ago

    According to the Redbook on coins, the penny:

    1909-1942: .950 copper, .050 tin and zinc

    1943: Steel coated with zinc

    1944-1946: .950 copper, .050 zinc. From cartridge cases.

    1947-1962: .950 copper, .050 tin and zinc

    1962-1982: .950 copper, .050 zinc

    1982-current: core .992 zinc .008 copper, plated with copper. total content .975 zinc .025 copper.

    1982 pennies had both, neither is rare like a copper 1943 or steel 1944.

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