Frazz by Jef Mallett

Frazz

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  1. capndunzzl

    capndunzzl said, over 2 years ago

    …that’s all our society is now days.

  2. garcoa

    garcoa said, over 2 years ago

    Check it at the door, Caulfield. But on the other hand, it seemed to have worked.

  3. Mourdac

    Mourdac said, over 2 years ago

    As you get older, Caulfield, you’ll often find yourself with those “insufficient funds”

  4. Tricia O

    Tricia O said, over 2 years ago

    I’ve had some of those weekends, when I was much younger.

  5. pupskweek

    pupskweek GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    Once again I don’t understand this strip—is this a quote from somebody semi-famous that only erudite and highly educated people know? (Like Caulfield and Frazz)

  6. Radical-Knight

    Radical-Knight said, over 2 years ago

    I’m telling you… This kid has presidential potential!!!

  7. bigpuma

    bigpuma said, over 2 years ago

    @pupsqueak: You’re not alone. I googled “that old line”. It returned zero search results. Mallett’s priorities for wordplay place making sense and being funny well below sounding smart and being abstruse.

  8. doublejake

    doublejake GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @bigpuma

    Not sure what “google” you used. Try the actual google using “wrote a check couldn’t cash” and you’ll get over 58,000,000 hits. A very common variant is “his mouth wrote a check his fists couldn’t cash” regarding someone who mouths off to someone and gets beaten up in return. MANY variants.

  9. bigpuma

    bigpuma said, over 2 years ago

    @doublejake: I’m familiar with the expression. The weekend / morning version is what I was referring to (and what I googled). Mrs. Olsen is referring to that particular variant very specifically, as if it were a version that we all might know. We don’t.

    Now explain some more, please. Why are her low expectations useful to Caulfield? Any reason beyond her not sending him to the principal’s for being late?

    Frazz’s punch line? Is he implying that he has low expectations of himself?

  10. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @pupskweek

    Caufield is speaking in metaphor. The weekend to give you a build up of rest only it didn’t so he had no means of getting that which he figured was promised. How often do people come to work on Monday more tired than they were on Friday?

  11. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @bigpuma

    With low expectations it is easier to slide by. Now when he wants to he can exceed it. The question is do the expectations of the other teachers match Mrs. Olsen’s? I’d say no.

  12. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @bigpuma

    Imagine having to think a little bit more to get it. I know you are against that and think it a terrible thing.

  13. comicsssfan

    comicsssfan said, over 2 years ago

    Caulfield has to take care to stay away from drink or those kind of weekends will materialize. If he develops a severe, debilitating addiction to spirits the only profession he’ll be good for is a public middle school principal.

  14. Tom Flapwell

    Tom Flapwell said, over 2 years ago

    Seems to me that these lower expectations work AGAINST Caulfield, in that the teacher doesn’t believe his excuse.

  15. bigpuma

    bigpuma said, over 2 years ago

    @Night-Gaunt49

    If my friends and family were to read this, Gaunt, they’d say you are the funniest person alive. If anything, I overthink things. When that fails, I ask the forum here for help. (Some answers are better than others. And, boy, is that an understatement.)

    So here is one more thought: Why would Mallett give Mrs. Olsen this severe attitude all of a sudden? She gets out of sorts with Caulfield, yes. But when have you ever seen her say something so negative, personal, and damning? She’s basically saying, “You’re lazy and boring you always will be.”

    You’d have to be a pretty lousy teacher (and a lousy person) to speak to a child in that way. Mallett’s goofy priorities again: setting up jokes counts; making characters consistent doesn’t.

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