Frank & Ernest by Thaves

Frank & Ernest

Comments (12) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. capndunzzl

    capndunzzl said, over 1 year ago

    ….Superman/shiny steel….Iron Man/rusty steel.

  2. Superfrog

    Superfrog said, over 1 year ago

    That would test their mettle.

  3. TREEINTHEWIND

    TREEINTHEWIND said, over 1 year ago

    WaterWoman to Superman, "Respect your elders – you know that Iron Man can become overwrought …….. and besides you are not stainless.

  4. Dr Dave

    Dr Dave said, over 1 year ago

    “Rusty!”

  5. Poollady

    Poollady said, over 1 year ago

    Where’s aluminum man?

  6. ChessPirate

    ChessPirate said, over 1 year ago

    Dr. Who?
    Antenna Man?

  7. InTraining

    InTraining said, over 1 year ago

    @TREEINTHEWIND

    Good one… ! ! ! LOL

  8. phritzg

    phritzg GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    Poor Iron Man has to pay extra for everything because he can’t use something that’s No Fe.

  9. frumgar

    frumgar GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    @ChessPirate

    Mysterion. It’s a South Park reference to Kenny’s superhero persona from the show “Mysterion Rises”.

  10. Johnny Robo

    Johnny Robo said, over 1 year ago

    iron =/= steel.

  11. Redkaycei Repoc

    Redkaycei Repoc said, over 1 year ago

    @Penny Robinson Fan Club

    Actually it wasn’t ‘long’ before that other guy. Both strips started just about the same time back in the 1930’s.

  12. Redkaycei Repoc

    Redkaycei Repoc said, over 1 year ago

    @dfrechet

    Black Sabbath’s Iron Man was not about Marvel’s super hero Tony Stark but refers to a childrens book of the same name.
    The Iron Man: A Children’s Story in Five Nights (1968) is a novel written by British Poet Laureate Ted Hughes (1930–98) and illustrated by Andrew Davidson. Described by some as a modern fairy tale,1 it describes the unexpected arrival in England of a giant “metal man” of unknown origin who rains destruction on the countryside by attacking industrial farm equipment, before befriending a small boy and defending the world from a monster from outer space. Expanding the narrative beyond a criticism of warfare and inter-human conflict,

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