Frank & Ernest by Thaves

Frank & Ernest

Comments (12) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. capndunzzl

    capndunzzl said, about 3 years ago

    ….Superman/shiny steel….Iron Man/rusty steel.

  2. Richard S. Russell

    Richard S. Russell GoComics PRO Member said, about 3 years ago

    Then there’s Bernie Madoff, Man of Steal.

  3. Superfrog

    Superfrog said, about 3 years ago

    That would test their mettle.

  4. TREEINTHEWIND

    TREEINTHEWIND said, about 3 years ago

    WaterWoman to Superman, "Respect your elders – you know that Iron Man can become overwrought …….. and besides you are not stainless.

  5. Dr Dave

    Dr Dave said, about 3 years ago

    “Rusty!”

  6. Poollady

    Poollady said, about 3 years ago

    Where’s aluminum man?

  7. ChessPirate

    ChessPirate said, about 3 years ago

    Dr. Who?
    Antenna Man?

  8. InTraining

    InTraining said, about 3 years ago

    @TREEINTHEWIND

    Good one… ! ! ! LOL

  9. frumgar

    frumgar GoComics PRO Member said, about 3 years ago

    @ChessPirate

    Mysterion. It’s a South Park reference to Kenny’s superhero persona from the show “Mysterion Rises”.

  10. Johnny Robo

    Johnny Robo said, about 3 years ago

    iron =/= steel.

  11. Redkaycei Repoc

    Redkaycei Repoc said, about 3 years ago

    Actually it wasn’t ‘long’ before that other guy. Both strips started just about the same time back in the 1930’s.

  12. Redkaycei Repoc

    Redkaycei Repoc said, about 3 years ago

    Black Sabbath’s Iron Man was not about Marvel’s super hero Tony Stark but refers to a childrens book of the same name.
    The Iron Man: A Children’s Story in Five Nights (1968) is a novel written by British Poet Laureate Ted Hughes (1930–98) and illustrated by Andrew Davidson. Described by some as a modern fairy tale,1 it describes the unexpected arrival in England of a giant “metal man” of unknown origin who rains destruction on the countryside by attacking industrial farm equipment, before befriending a small boy and defending the world from a monster from outer space. Expanding the narrative beyond a criticism of warfare and inter-human conflict,

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