Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau

Doonesbury

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  1. dtroutma

    dtroutma GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    Glad she made it back. A little redhead I taught to ski, didn’t make it back from her second tour (medic).

  2. too-zonked

    too-zonked said, over 2 years ago

    I’m sorry the medic did not make it back. Her story is one of the thousands of tragedies that should tell us to bring everyone home.

  3. leftwingpatriot

    leftwingpatriot said, over 2 years ago

    You have to love Mel’s toughness.

  4. keenanthelibrarian

    keenanthelibrarian said, over 2 years ago

    Doing it for money obviously makes all the difference.

  5. The Nihilist

    The Nihilist said, over 2 years ago

    The square peg picked a suitable place to grow and become more…

  6. gmartin997

    gmartin997 GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    After her enlistment, Mel could go into womens’ professional wrestling.

  7. WickedDaleWitch

    WickedDaleWitch said, over 2 years ago

    @RDT64, I am not “a typical two faced, anti-military jerk,” but I also would have interpreted Principal Wilkes’ remark in the same manner as keenanthelibrarian. Is that a problem?

  8. Gator007

    Gator007 said, over 2 years ago

    @RDT64

    Looks like he’s a jerk!

  9. Thirdguy

    Thirdguy said, over 2 years ago

    Kids, lets play nice, we don’t want to start a war, or something!

  10. Pacopuddy

    Pacopuddy said, over 2 years ago

    @RDT64

    I agree with the comment – it appears its okay to bully/beat up/kill somebody if your country’s paying you to do it. But not otherwise.

  11. bagbalm

    bagbalm said, over 2 years ago

    There will be increasing opportunities in private security as economic conditions deteriorate.

  12. Doughfoot

    Doughfoot said, over 2 years ago

    Here in Virginia in 1776 our Founding Fathers declared that “a well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained to arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defense of a free state; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided as dangerous to liberty; and that, in all cases, the military should be under strict subordination to, and be governed by, the civil power.”

    In 1776, they thought that the existence of a professional military was an unnecessary evil. If the people themselves were properly prepared to defend their country from invasion, then an efficient and effective force could be organized in time of emergency, and would be unneeded otherwise. They could not envision a free and moral country ever sending its troops into another country unless it were first invaded. Though it was finally acknowledged that a small cadre of trained officers, and a few thousand soldiers to police the Indian tribes and frontiers were necessary, and the Marines were sent to the Shores of Tripoli, the U.S. maintained one of the worlds smallest peacetime militaries from 1776 to 1939, and enlisted men were looked upon with some contempt in peacetime. They were paid a pittance, recruited mostly from recent immigrants and the unemployable. The U.S. Army has a peacetime desertion rate of 25% per annum in the 19th century, and officers stayed on active duty into their dotage as no pensions were granted. Professional soldiers, if not officers, were seen as mercenaries.

    All this changes somewhat in WWI, and completely in WWII. From 1941 on, we have been on a war footing continually. The Cold War hardly ended (as no one really expected it ever to) before we adopted another perpetual war (the war on terror). If our enemies did not exist, it would be necessary to invent them.

    The Federal Government has grown gigantically in the last 100 years, chiefly owing to the expansion of its police and defense powers. Once it was understood than wishing for a small weak federal government and wishing for a small weak military logically went hand in hand, as the latter is the instrument of the former. And as for the military being under strict subordination to civil power, we have the confusion that leads people to call the President the Commander in Chief of the United States, rather than the C-in-C of the armed forces. The President is meant to be the C-in-C of the military, but he is also meant to be the SERVANT of the people.

    It is precisely because our military is no longer made up of the body of the people trained to arms, in which any and all might be called upon to serve, that we are so obsessive about “supporting the troops” and talking about their “patriotic service” out there “defending freedom”.

    I don’t know, perhaps someone can tell me, what percentage of our armed forces today joined up for selfless reasons of wishing to serve their nation in spite of having more lucrative and safe options, and what percentage joined up because, in spite of the risks, it was just what they wanted to do, or because it seemed the best career option open to them. For how many is it a job, even an attractive job, and for how many is it rather a matter of self-sacrifice?

    What exactly is the difference now between the patriot soldier and the mercenary soldier?

    I don’t mean to judge. Just wondering.

  13. Bill McQueen

    Bill McQueen said, over 2 years ago

    @Doughfoot

    Boy, that was long…

    I guess you can thank the industrial revolution and the economy. I joined at the end of the Vietnam ‘peace action’ so I did not serve in any war or make some of the sacrifices our young people do now. I joined at a time when the economy was not good, as it is not good now, so one of the big motivations was to get a marketable skill.

    I did want to make a meaningful contribution in the service, and later in life and I never regretted going into the service. Note that it is called the service and the people who serve are called service men and women.

  14. Tacopielvr

    Tacopielvr said, over 2 years ago

    @RDT64

    You’re an idiot. There was nothing anti-military about that remark at all. Most of the worst bullies I ever knew served in the services.

  15. Hufn

    Hufn said, over 2 years ago

    @keenanthelibrarian

    No, no, no, a psychopath kills for no reason, I kill for money, it’s a job. That didn’t come out right.

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