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"Frog Applause reminds one of learning to read, in the sense that each word in the captions seems 'surprising' and new. Teresa's writing takes one back to that fresh state of mind (typical of, but of course not limited to, childhood) in which the brain, free of preconceptions, doesn't 'fill in' any blind spots along the way but rather wholly embraces the present moment as it unfolds. Every sentence is literally an imagination-expanding adventure." — Craig Conley, author of One-Letter Words: A Dictionary (HarperCollins)

Frog Applause

Teresa Burritt

A fantastic saga of adventure both high and low, of forbidden passion and iambic pentameter, of fays, fools, organists, demons, accordions, heaven, hell and Shakespeare, Pibgorn follows the whims and flights of its eponymous fairy heroine as she plies her conviction that there must be more to life than depositing dew drops on dandelions and sleeping under mushrooms.

Pibgorn

Brooke McEldowney

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Working Daze follows the employees trapped at MacroMicroMedia. MMM is a wanna-be software giant, and it's staffed by geeks and clueless management types. VP Rita will try anything that might make a little money (though her ideas usually don't.) Underpaid Dana carries he place and keeps it running, while overpaid Ed sleeps all day. Roy and Kathy are made for each other, and everyman Jay never knows when to keep his opinions to himself. Writer/creator John Zakour is a humor/sci-fi writer, whose work includes the Zach Johnson detective novels. Artist Scott Roberts was a longtime contributor to Nickelodeon Magazine, and is the author of the fantasy novel The Troubling Stone. John and Scott met when they both worked on the Rugrats newspaper strip.

Working Daze

John Zakour and Scott Roberts

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Do you like penguins, unicorns, puppies and rainbows? Then don't read EEK! EEK! has nothing to do with that junk. But if you like cadavers, mutants, chainsaws, zombies, cockroaches, telemarketers and other vermin, you've come to the right place.Caution: EEK! is highly flammable. Keep away from heat, sparks, or open flame. Use only with adequate ventilation. Prolonged exposure may produce bulging eyes, decreased night vision, dizziness, confusion, atypical facial pain, personality changes, itching without a rash, splotchy complexion, excessive thirst, insomnia, and bloating. EEK! is known to cause insanity in laboratory rats.

Eek!

Scott Nickel

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If you’ve ever struggled to turn your cell phone off, thought cookies were just a delicious snack, and tried in vain to talk to a human customer service rep, Charles Boyce has created a strip for you. Compu-toon reminds us that technological innovations haven’t necessarily made our lives any easier -- maybe just more funny.

Compu-toon

Charles Boyce

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No one in town -- neither the real estate developer nor the relatives -- was happy when Farmer Ray left everything to his beloved farm animals. So they fled in fear, leaving a spunky young girl named Pearl to battle for their rights. Now the farm is theirs, but neither Pearl, nor the Wise Crow, nor the Weird Rabbits, can find them. Join the intrepid trio as they adventure their way across the land, seeking wide and far for their long lost home sweet home.

2 Cows and a Chicken

Steve Skelton

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This high-flying single-panel comic spotlights and savors the foibles, stupidity, and goofiness of our colorful unnatural world. It's all about attitude, as the denizens of Bluemel's realm devote themselves to surviving life's pitfalls, whether nesting in quicksand or coping with the technological advances of the tapeworm. From word play to fowl play, from weirdness in the wilderness, to the irony of iron ore, Birdbrains makes the offbeat seem natural. It's a feature to laugh at: if it makes you think, you're working too hard.

Birdbrains

Thom Bluemel

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The 1980s was a truly classic period in comic strip history. The decade of spiked hair and shoulder pads introduced us to brilliantly off-the-wall The Far Side, the timeless antics of Calvin and Hobbes, and the sociopolitical brilliance of Bloom County. All of these strips were retired at the height of their popularity by their award-winning creators, and fans have hoped ever since to talk them back into syndication with heaps of fan mail and social media begging, all for naught. Until now. Berkeley Breathed has talked himSELF out of retirement after Donald Trump threw his hat into an overpopulated ring of hopefuls for the Republican presidential nomination. Inspired by Trump's promise to "make America great again," Breathed is making the comics page great again with Bloom County 2015. Bloom County’s Opus, Milo, Bill the Cat and all of the residents of Bloom House are back and they aren't wasting a minute mocking the Republican campaign's greatest bloviator and a renewed national ridiculousness. Bloom County is the tale of the residents of Bloom House, a boarding house run by the parents of worldly 10-year-old newspaper reporter Milo Bloom. Boarders include Opus, Steve, Bill the Cat, Portnoy, Oliver Wendell Jones and more. Together, these characters parodied presidential campaigns, the Parents Music Resource Center, labor unions, the war on drugs, and The Donald -- no one was off limits. After his 25-year hiatus, "Silliness suddenly seems safe now," said Breathed.

Bloom County 2016

Berkeley Breathed

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Pairing vintage comic art with hilarious, new dialog by Disney veteran writer John Lustig, Last Kiss revels in the absurdities of love, lust and 'life with lip.' The series originated when Lustig bought the publishing rights to a romance comic book series from the 50's and 60's, and started rewriting the stories for fun. Since then, the re-dialogued comics have been a popular feature in newspapers, magazines, comic books and greeting cards. Today Last Kiss is gaining popularity and is also available on email cards from Jib Jab and greeting cards from NobleWorks. Check www.lastkissinc.com for the latest news and product launches.

Last Kiss

John Lustig

Applauded by both the Washington Post and Wired magazine, Too Much Coffee Man is just the twitchy, existential Superhero-everyman for these high-octane times. The pre-eminent icon of caffeine culture, TMCM gives us wild flights of fancy and dazzling monologues, twisted commentary and endless dollops of over-amped anxiety.

Too Much Coffee Man

Shannon Wheeler

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Welcome to the wonderful world of obsessive compulsive cartoonist Frank Page and his band of misfits. Bob the Squirrel chronicles the life and times of Bob, a squirrel and Frank, the human he's taken in as his own. Other ingredients in this comic strip stew include Frank's girlfriend- the effervescent "foofy coffee chick" Lezley, her daughter Lauren and Maggie, the overly protective pug mix. And to complete the meal, why don't we throw in Frank's dog, a jack russell terrier named Lucy---a dog who loves to climb trees, eat nacho chips and generally be the yang to Bob's ying. There's something for everyone in Bob the Squirrel... so, make a daily stop to see what's going on. You will not be disappointed.

Bob the Squirrel

Frank Page

A lost little dog’s picture hangs on a telephone pole, a note begging for his return, reward offered, no questions asked. But the picture was taken some time ago, the poster now faded and curled from sun and rain. The Little Dog is a long way from the home he longs for. But truth be told, for Little Dog, the adventure of the open road is addictive – fraught with exploits both humorous and heroic, filled with characters both good and bad (but always interesting), and imbued with life lessons. Like any good adventure story, Little Dog Lost by Steve Boreman is a metaphor for broader concepts and bigger concerns. It contains parables and morality plays, palatably packaged in humorous comic strip form.

Little Dog Lost

Steve Boreman

Jeremy Lambros’ Domestic Abuse is the result of his long standing personal grudge with inanimate objects, convinced they were either conspiring against him or responsible for his every hardship. Anyone who has ever struggled to program their VCR will appreciate this comic.

Domestic Abuse

Jeremy Lambros

Behold, an un-pale horse with no name. Oh, wait. His name is Horace. And he's sarcastic. And silly. And lives in an infinitely expandable world. And sometimes gets slapstuck. And day after unpredictable day he boldly goes where no horse -- let alone a comic strip -- has gone before. Yes, there are sidekicks; a bird, a lady horse, a never-seen neighbor. And if the post-it note did not exist, Samson would have had to invent it so Horace would have yellow panels in which to play. Welcome to the bright side of the world. May the horse be with you.

Dark Side of the Horse

Samson

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Baby-boomers Charlie and Jeannie could enjoy the peacefulness and quietude that belongs to empty nesters - if their children would actually leave them alone. Three generations of the Stevens family provide a readers with a poignant and hysterical depiction of parenting, grandparenting and kids.

Nest Heads

John Allen