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Lalo Alcaraz, award-winning editorial cartoonist and Latino journalist, captures the essence of the country's changing cultural and political landscape. Alcaraz's work appears in newspapers around the country, including LA Weekly and La Opinion.

Lalo Alcaraz

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Nick Anderson of the Houston Chronicle is an avowed independent who covers politics and contemporary cultural issues in a way that connects with readers. His loose, idiosyncratic style carries with it an unconventional message that has broad appeal. "I approach my work with a healthy skepticism for the ideological extremists littering our political landscape," explains Anderson.

Nick Anderson

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Clever and unpredictable, two-time Pulitzer finalist Robert Ariail skewers politicians on both sides of the ideological fence with award-winning cartoons drawn for the Spartanburg, S.C., Herald-Journal.

Robert Ariail

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From Ann Coulter to aspiring Hollywood starlets, to The Da Vinci Code, to President Bush, this comic puts is own spin on current events not limited to the world of politics. Bad reporters like Jayson Blair and Stephen Glass blurring the lines between fact and fiction, Bad Reporter promises to expose "the lies behind the truth, and the truth behind those lies that are behind that truth."

Bad Reporter

Don Asmussen

Darrin Bell challenges social, political and cultural assumptions. His award-winning work navigates issues such as civil rights, pop culture, family, science fiction, scriptural wisdom and nihilist philosophy while often casting subjects in roles that are traditionally denied them. According to Darrin, "I cast against type to tell dynamic stories, of people who're bold enough and secure enough to challenge preconceptions. I depict that as the true legacy of America, in everything from its explorers, to its democratic-republican form of government, to its civil rights struggle, to its injection of mankind into space, to its musical innovations. There’s nothing more fundamentally all-American than a square peg that insists on filling a round hole." Darrin also creates the comic strips Candorville and Rudy Park.

Darrin Bell

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A nominated finalist for the Pulitzer 6 times since 1999, Chattanooga Times Free Press cartoonist Clay Bennett won the Prize in 2002. He has also earned just about every other editorial cartoon award there is, including the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, the John Fischetti Editorial Cartoon Competition, the Overseas Press Club's Thomas Nast Award, the National Headliner Award, the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi Award, the National Journalism Award from the Scripps Howard Foundation, and the National Cartoonists Society Division Award for Best Editorial Cartoons. Bennett was also named Editorial Cartoonist of the Year by Editor & Publisher magazine in 2001.

Clay Bennett

Mix a snifter of Bill Mauldin, a dash of Jeff McNelly and a very large dollop of common sense, and you begin to get an idea of Lisa Benson’s considerable talent.

Lisa Benson

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Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning in 1993, Steve Benson has been a lightning rod for more than 20 years as the staff editorial cartoonist for The Arizona Republic. Benson sums up his career best: "I don’t aim to please. I just aim." 

Steve Benson

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The 1980s was a truly classic period in comic strip history. The decade of spiked hair and shoulder pads introduced us to brilliantly off-the-wall The Far Side, the timeless antics of Calvin and Hobbes, and the sociopolitical brilliance of Bloom County. All of these strips were retired at the height of their popularity by their award-winning creators, and fans have hoped ever since to talk them back into syndication with heaps of fan mail and social media begging, all for naught. Until now. Berkeley Breathed has talked himSELF out of retirement after Donald Trump threw his hat into an overpopulated ring of hopefuls for the Republican presidential nomination. Inspired by Trump's promise to "make America great again," Breathed is making the comics page great again with Bloom County 2015. Bloom County’s Opus, Milo, Bill the Cat and all of the residents of Bloom House are back and they aren't wasting a minute mocking the Republican campaign's greatest bloviator and a renewed national ridiculousness. Bloom County is the tale of the residents of Bloom House, a boarding house run by the parents of worldly 10-year-old newspaper reporter Milo Bloom. Boarders include Opus, Steve, Bill the Cat, Portnoy, Oliver Wendell Jones and more. Together, these characters parodied presidential campaigns, the Parents Music Resource Center, labor unions, the war on drugs, and The Donald -- no one was off limits. After his 25-year hiatus, "Silliness suddenly seems safe now," said Breathed.

Bloom County 2016

Berkeley Breathed

"Chip" Bok has been the staff editorial cartoonist for the Akron Beacon Journal since 1987. Through Creators Syndicate, his cartoons appear in over 100 publications, including the Chicago Tribune, Washington Post, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Time, and Newsweek. He is also a regular contributing cartoonist for Reason magazine and serves as a member of the steering committee for The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press in Arlington, Virginia.

Chip Bok

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Meet Aaron McGruder’s The Boondocks: Huey and Riley Freeman, Jazmine DuBois, and Huey’s best friend, Caesar. This comic strip reflects the racial diversity and complexity of our world. Combining Huey’s childish antics with contemporary political and social satire, the strip explores the terrain where dashikis and Brand Nubian CDs meet The Gap and Hanson.

The Boondocks

Aaron McGruder

From recession woes to social networking, Matt Bors’ cartoons dissect and satirize the ways of the world to make readers think and laugh about the real issues affecting them.

Matt Bors

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Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Steve Breen is fast developing a reputation for provocative political cartoons that have captured the attention of some of the nation's premier publications. His cartoons regularly appear in The New York Times, USA Today, Newsweek and US News and World Report. His comic strip, Grand Avenue, appears in more than 150 newspapers across the country.

Steve Breen

A self-described liberal, award-winning editorial cartoonist Chris Britt nevertheless delights in skewering deserving politicians of every persuasion. Britt's sardonic, biting cartoons are sometimes controversial, often outrageous and always thought-provoking.

Chris Britt

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Darrin Bell’s Candorville is an insightful look at family, community and race through the eyes of Lemont Brown, a young black writer. Bell pulls no punches and delves into even the most controversial of issues. The wit and humor of the strip will draw you in.

Candorville

Darrin Bell

Award-winning editorial cartoons that blend humor and artistry to deliver serious social commentary.

Stuart Carlson

Ken Catalino is a conservative cartoonist who is happiest puncturing balloons filled with the lightweight gas of liberal idealism. This doesn’t prevent him from criticizing conservatives on occasion, if reason and rationality are violated

Ken Catalino

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Jeff Danziger provides a scathing international take on politics, finance, and everything else you aren’t allowed to discuss at the dinner table. Combining spot-on caricatures with razor-sharp writing, this feature will make you listen a little more closely to what they tell you on the news.

Jeff Danziger

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A Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist, Davies cuts to the chase on every major issue, deftly penetrating the spin and obfuscation to show readers what's really at the heart. His caustic wit combines with a strong moral sensibility to render the complex comprehensible.

Matt Davies

John Deering has been the editorial cartoonist for the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette since 1988. John won the John Fischetti Editorial Cartooning award given by Columbia College Chicago in 1994, and the Clifford K. and James T. Berryman Award from the National Press Foundation in 1996.

John Deering

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Articulate, abrasive, political, compassionate, misunderstood, misprinted and outrageous -- never complacent. Garry Trudeau is America's premier social and political satirist.

Doonesbury

Garry Trudeau

Tim Eagan’s unique style of provocative political satire has won it a loyal following. Using an unusual mini-movie storytelling format, recovering lawyer Tim Eagan punctures pompous personalities, deflates bloviators, and attempts to shine light where it is most needed. This outrageous strip appears in mainstream and alternative West Coast papers and has been described as "Tom the Dancing Bug meets Ted Rall."

Tim Eagan

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Since 1983, Bob Gorrell has been an editorial cartoonist in Richmond, Va. first with the Richmond News Leader and then, starting in 1992, with the Richmond Times-Dispatch. On January 1, 1998, he resigned from the Times-Dispatch to concentrate on syndicated editorial cartoons and comic panel features for Creators Syndicate.

Bob Gorrell

Known for his wry sense of humor and thought provoking commentary, nationally syndicated editorial cartoonist Walt Handelsman attacks the pressing issues of the times. His entertaining and insightful cartoons cover topics ranging from national and local politics to social concerns.

Walt Handelsman

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Phil Hands is the editorial cartoonist for the Wisconsin State Journal, in Madison, Wis. He draws cartoons on a wide range of topics from state politics to international affairs. A passionate political moderate, Phil creates thoughtful editorial cartoons that attack the partisan hacks and hypocrites on both sides of the aisle. Phil has won a number of state awards for editorial cartooning and was the 2012 recipient of the Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi award for editorial cartooning for circulation under 100,000.

Phil Hands

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Joe Heller has been the staff editorial cartoonist for the Green Bay Press-Gazette since 1985. His cartoons appear in more than 350 publications, making him the most self-syndicated cartoonist in the nation.

Joe Heller

Rebecca Hendin's illustrations take a look at current events with a combination of existential anxiety and sheer amazement at the inexplicable beauty of existence, with a cherry of deadpan jibe on top. Her viewpoint reflects her transatlantic residence between the UK and the United States, giving her a unique perspective on situations on all sides of the seas. Blog | Website

Rebecca Hendin

Staff cartoonist for the Boston Herald since 1986, Holbert serves up solid conservative commentary, delivered with a smile.

Jerry Holbert

A hilarious, enraged, snotty, and smart underground sensation! Hutch Owen’s acclaimed, award-winning dregs-of-society adventures skewer the multinational, mega-merging, corporate forces that control our lives. Tom Hart's popular vagrant/rebel Hutch Owen rages while the world around him builds, merges, attends marketing seminars and goes IPO. The streets and alleyways that are his bedroom and study are now invisible beneath a coat of crude and insulting ads. In an #Occupy World, Hutch Owen’s long-standing dissenting voice is a rallying cry for the #99%! With three graphic novels to-date, and over a dozen stories, Hutch Owen was Furious When Furious Wasn’t Cool! He is the original occupier, fighting The Man to keep to his values and integrity in a cold and commercial world.

Hutch Owen

Tom Hart

Jen Sorensen has been doing a weekly editorial comic since 1998. Since its start, she has won numerous awards (including seven from the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies) and was a finalist for the Herblock Prize in 2012. In 2013, Sorensen won the prestigious Reuben Award in the Editorial Cartoon division. Her work has appeared in the Village Voice, L.A. Times, Daily Kos, MAD Magazine, Nickelodeon Magazine and many, many more. Her art is vibrant and precise, and her commentary is razor sharp. Populated by recurring characters and a caustic wit, this is not a comic for the fainthearted.

Jen Sorensen