Brewster Rockit by Tim Rickard

Brewster Rockit

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  1. margueritem

    margueritem GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    What a conundrum.

  2. Veridian

    Veridian said, about 1 year ago

    More like a Miscalibration of the respective AstroNavComps involved….Either that, or a severe Gravitational Gradient cause by an imminent Black Hole, A teaspoonful of Dwarf Star Alloy, or Olaf the Giant sitting down to Dinner in the Galley….. readers Choice!

  3. Bruno Zeigerts

    Bruno Zeigerts said, about 1 year ago

    Not only are most science fiction ships portrayed as operating on the same plane of reference, they are usually constructed with a definite up and down orientation(ie top and bottom)
    The only possible exception I can think of would be the original Cylon Base star … it pretty much looked the same if you flipped it over … but it still had a definite top and bottom.

  4. Kali39

    Kali39 said, about 1 year ago

    Shouldn’t Brewster be standing on his head?

  5. Nabuquduriuzhur

    Nabuquduriuzhur said, about 1 year ago

    “And now then, eager young space cadet, here is the course we shall pursue to find Planet X. Starting from where we are, we go 33,600 turbo miles due up. Then west in an astro-arc deviation to here, then following the great circle seven radiolubes south by downeast. By astro-astrolabe to here, here, and here, then by space navigo-compass to here, here, and then to here and here. By thirteen point strato-cumulus bearing four million light-years, and thus to our destination. Now do you know how to reach Planet X? "
    .
    I always got a kick out of “due up”. If one can call it Z+ or Z-, why not “Due Up” and “Due Down”?

  6. Bruno Zeigerts

    Bruno Zeigerts said, about 1 year ago

    @440RoadRunner

    But the Death Star still has a definite ‘up or down’ orientation… but I suppose most organic species might build them that way out of habit…

  7. WillardMBaker

    WillardMBaker said, about 1 year ago

    Or the Space Station. A hodge pod of odd parts connected randomly. But a pure sphere like the Death Star is the best form for a ship, IMHO. Also, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyson_Sphere for the heck of it.

  8. Ray C

    Ray C said, about 1 year ago

    It’s simple, really. The Galactic North Pole (points toward Coma Berenices) defines “up”. All star ships to this day drive with their up-side pointing toward galactic north, as long as their pilots stay sober. Now as to intergalactic space travel, there we have a problem we won’t have to worry about in our lifetimes.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galactic_coordinate_system

  9. jfmcenanly

    jfmcenanly said, about 1 year ago

    @WillardMBaker

    Outside the station, they refer to the x-axis ( the direction of travel in orbit) and the z axis, ( the direction toward the Earth). Inside, Each module has its own up and down direction,

  10. frumdebang

    frumdebang said, about 1 year ago

    Gene Roddenberry made the decision at the very beginning of Star Trek nearly 50 years ago that all space ships would be shown “up,” and multiple ships would always be shown in the same orientation.

  11. Clark  Kent

    Clark Kent said, about 1 year ago

    Gravity determines up and down.

  12. JPuzzleWhiz

    JPuzzleWhiz said, about 1 year ago

    Brewster has always lacked direction.

  13. Ionizer

    Ionizer said, about 1 year ago

    Old song about a proud mama watching her son’s battalion on parade: “They’re all out of step but Jim!”

  14. tsandl

    tsandl said, about 1 year ago

    @SeaFox10

    KHAAAAAAN!

  15. GoodQuestion

    GoodQuestion GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    Alas, Babylon, 5 . . . ☻

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