Ben Sargent by Ben Sargent

Ben Sargent

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  1. Zuhlamon

    Zuhlamon said, over 1 year ago

    Gerrymandering gets most of the job (of retaining power) done, while voter suppression and agitprop does the rest.

  2. Craig Linder

    Craig Linder said, over 1 year ago

    @Gore Bane

    Actually, with some straightforward changes in how representatives are elected, we could do so. We have a system that is based on creating districts that are geographically continuous. The Constitution does not require this. What it requires is one person, one vote.

    This requirement could be achieved by many means. For example, since the number of representatives is based upon population (one-person-one-vote), all of the individuals running for office could be put on a statewide ballot that all of the state’s citizens get to vote on. If a state gets 3 reps, the top three vote getters become the state’s representatives. (You could also have a runoff procedure if the proportion gotten by the candidates falls below some threshold because of the number of candidates running and the distribution of the votes.)

    Thus, if blacks, women, whites, whoever choose to vote primarily for a particular candidate in sufficient numbers, that candidate will be elected. And there will be no need for gerrymandering (it wouldn’t be possible).

    I’ve left some details out of this particular scheme (and there are others), but the basic point is that we could stop using geography within states and start using other means to ensure everyone has a fair shot at electing the person of their choice and having confidence that their vote will truly count for something while still ensuring the requirement of one-person-one-vote is met.

  3. Craig Linder

    Craig Linder said, over 1 year ago

    For anyone who is interested in this topic, this Wikipedia article is a decent starting point.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voting_system

    I think it’s important to realize our system is not the only way to achieve fairness and that other systems have the potential to be fairer (and easier to implement) than what we have today.

  4. wbr

    wbr said, over 1 year ago

    linder how many minority senators are there?

  5. coraryan

    coraryan GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    Typical Liberal rant.

  6. Zuhlamon

    Zuhlamon said, over 1 year ago

    @coraryan

    Typical Liberal rant.
    .
    because…?

  7. d_legendary1 Demands Dr.C and Martens Release

    d_legendary1 Demands Dr.C and Martens Release said, over 1 year ago

    @wbr

    Linder is about the vote, not the senators in office. Learn some reading comprehension please.

  8. pirate227

    pirate227 said, over 1 year ago

    The GOP knows that their base is dying off and the future does not include them.

  9. wbr

    wbr said, over 1 year ago

    dear d_legendarydumb1 if you have state wide vote for rep it will turn out just like senate elections

  10. SusanCraig

    SusanCraig said, over 1 year ago

    @wbr

    dear WBR — read this article from 9/12 to see how many minority senators and/or representatives there are:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/27/black-senators_n_1914216.html

  11. Craig Linder

    Craig Linder said, over 1 year ago

    @Eryx

    Eryx, based on the responses to my posts here, I rest my case for why I’ve been lurking. Same old same old. I wonder what sort of jobs some of our posters hold and what their relationships are like with their fellow workers.

  12. wbr

    wbr said, over 1 year ago

    thanks for proving my point susan

  13. Craig Linder

    Craig Linder said, over 1 year ago

    @wbr

    if you have state wide vote for rep it will turn out just like senate elections


    That isn’t the case because the number of representatives per state would be a function of the state’s population—which is not the case for the senators—and it’s not a winner-take-all system. Reread what I wrote and you’ll see that.

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