Barney & Clyde by Gene Weingarten, Dan Weingarten & David Clark

Barney & Clyde

Comments (17) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. afficionado

    afficionado said, over 3 years ago

    keep me out of it guys

  2. DirtyDragon

    DirtyDragon said, over 3 years ago

    Punk

  3. randayn

    randayn GoComics PRO Member said, over 3 years ago

    Well put, Dirty Dragon.

  4. Hillbillyman

    Hillbillyman said, over 3 years ago

    UH! Oh! you guys saw me in my underwear!

  5. formally known as doc white

    formally known as doc white said, over 3 years ago

    Bob and Bing did it all the time.

  6. formally known as doc white

    formally known as doc white said, over 3 years ago

    @Hillbillyman

    Don’t worry. I on the other hand, do not have underware. I gave them up in vietnam.

  7. Redhead55

    Redhead55 said, over 3 years ago

    @formally known as doc white

    TMI! TMI! lol

  8. TheIrishInquisition

    TheIrishInquisition said, over 3 years ago

    @Hillbillyman

    You’re not the only one.

  9. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, over 3 years ago

    It depends on what it is. Breaking the fourth wall here is not wanted.

  10. Dry and Dusty

    Dry and Dusty GoComics PRO Member said, over 3 years ago

    I like the term “the fourth wall” but I still don’t quite understand what it means.

  11. dapperdan61

    dapperdan61 GoComics PRO Member said, over 3 years ago

    Boston Legal used to break the 4th wall on occasion. So did Northern Exposure. Sometimes it works like in Ferris Bueller & sometimes it’s not very good

  12. fritzoid

    fritzoid GoComics PRO Member said, over 3 years ago

    Dry, the second panel here is as good an explanation as you’re ever going to find. Can you be more specific about what you stll find elusive?


    “Breaking the fourth wall” is as old as theater itself (although the term is far more recent). When a character on a stage (Hamlet, for instance) delivers a soliloquy, if he’s facing forwards (i.e. talking to the audience rather than talking to himself), he’s breaking the fourth wall. The Greeks wore masks throughout their plays, which meant that pretty much ALL of the speeches (and that’s what Greek theater largely WAS, characters taking turns making speeches) were delivered directly to the audience, so they cou7ld be heard.


    In SOME cases (Hamlet again springs to mind) reminding the audience that they’re watching a play is a large part of the intent. When a play is itself about being in/watching a play, periodic distancing elements (lines like “All the world’s a stage”, actually putting a play-within-a-play onstage, having a Prologue character specifically refer to the stage and theater), it becomes “meta-theater.” In the same sense, comic strip characters who “know” they’re comic strip characters leads to “met-comics.”

  13. fritzoid

    fritzoid GoComics PRO Member said, over 3 years ago

    In some ways, “breaking the fourth wall” has the contrary effect of drawing the audience further into the artificial construct they’re observing. In the last panel, Barney and Clyde may be reminding us that we’re reading a comic strip, but by interacting with us we become participants in the strip, not merely bystanders. When Iago and Richard III explain to us the rationale behind their villainies, we become not merely witnesses to their crimes, we are at that point complicit; we know what their victims do not, yet we are powerless to help them. In fact, we do not WANT to help them, because then the story we came to see could not unfold. That’s part of the katharsis which, when everything is resolved, fiction provides.

  14. ƹʅɗʘ "The whole Haul" Phil D. Albert

    ƹʅɗʘ "The whole Haul" Phil D. Albert said, over 3 years ago

    The Term ‘Fourth Wall’ goes back to Productions of the Greeks, when the “Glass Ceiling” was an absolute Wall unmentioned. Floors didn’t count as Walls, then.

  15. afficionado

    afficionado said, over 3 years ago

    @formally known as doc white

    you went cmmando when you were a commando?

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