Barney & Clyde by Gene Weingarten, Dan Weingarten & David Clark

Barney & ClydeNo Zoom

Comments (10) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. Lewreader

    Lewreader said, about 6 years ago

    I”m predestined. I’m going to die. Why work, go to school. or pay my bills? Move over Clyde, I’m claiming half this bench.

  2. runar

    runar said, about 6 years ago

    ”Like genitals to the gods are we…they play with us for their sport.”

    Unknown

  3. fritzoid

    fritzoid GoComics PRO Member said, about 6 years ago

    There’s a divinity that shapes our ends, Rough-hew them how we will –

    In the name of Weingarten, Weingarten, and Clark - a trinity?

    This comment brought to you by Divinity (TM) countour undergarments – “”We shape your ends!”

  4. Doctor Toon

    Doctor Toon said, about 6 years ago

    It is nice to know your place in the grand scheme of things.

  5. jtpozenel

    jtpozenel said, about 6 years ago

    Ho boy! Is he ever full of it, or what?

  6. motivemagus

    motivemagus said, about 6 years ago

    Whoa! Seven weeks and it’s already gone “meta.”

  7. fritzoid

    fritzoid GoComics PRO Member said, about 6 years ago

    “Full of it?” Clyde’s observations are often florid, but generally well-thought-out and to the point.

  8. DirtyDragon

    DirtyDragon said, about 6 years ago

    So who are these puppeteers, and what is their agenda?

    Coming this week on Glenn Beck.

  9. fritzoid

    fritzoid GoComics PRO Member said, about 6 years ago

    The term “fourth wall” comes from theater and television, where an interior set would literally only have three walls. To break the fourth (i.e. the “missing”) wall is to speak to the audience or camera. To extend the metaphor to comics, perhaps looking behind the back of the panel would be a third-wall breach. But if you consider that a comic panel has four borders (top, bottom, left, right), perhaps the back would be considered a fifth wall (making a comic character who speaks to the audience guilty of a sixth-wall violation)…

  10. fritzoid

    fritzoid GoComics PRO Member said, about 6 years ago

    On a related topic, the effect of Hamlet’s soliloquies can be vastly different if they are played as “Hamlet talking to the audience” as opposed to “Hamlet talking to himself.” Most seem to do the latter, but Jacobi did the former, and in my own production I’d have Hamlet speaking to the audience. I wouldn’t necessarily make that choice for ALL Shakespearean soliloquies, but Hamlet in many ways anticipates metatheater.

    Like Vonnegut’s Kilgore Trout, Hamlet is the rare fictional character astute enough to intuit that he’s fictional…

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