Agnes by Tony Cochran

Agnes

Comments (16) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. Pacopuddy

    Pacopuddy said, about 22 hours ago

    Are you even allowed to eat grackles?


    Are they not a “bird royal”, like a swan? Surely only the Queen is permitted to eat a grackle. (Though I doubt she’d want to . . . )

  2. pschearer

    pschearer GoComics PRO Member said, about 20 hours ago

    A skateboard and no helmet? How diabolical, Alice.

  3. rshive

    rshive said, about 17 hours ago

    The grackle will skate around the trailer, eventually falling and breaking it’s neck.

  4. prasrinivara

    prasrinivara GoComics PRO Member said, about 17 hours ago

    @Pacopuddy

    No — grackles are North-America-only birds, only European-native birds such as nightingales and chaffinches (which DIDN’t sucessfully introduce to North America) are covered.

  5. prasrinivara

    prasrinivara GoComics PRO Member said, about 17 hours ago

    I didn’t know Agnes was smart enough to design a loophole to get around the contradictions of panel 2 and actually eating the bird.

  6. DavidHuieGreen

    DavidHuieGreen said, about 15 hours ago

    And if the skate board doesn’t work, she can try teaching the grackle to play chicken.

  7. ladylagomorph76

    ladylagomorph76 said, about 14 hours ago

    Kids here do the luge on skateboards down hills…busy streets that are hills! There have been accidents, but so far no deaths.

  8. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, about 13 hours ago

    Only the desperate will eat such things as grackles.

  9. jadoo823

    jadoo823 said, about 13 hours ago

    …four-and-twenty blackbirds baked in a pie…

  10. ellisaana

    ellisaana GoComics PRO Member said, about 13 hours ago

    OK- I know this is a comic and in a comic universe rules are different. Agnes and Trout probably aren’t concerned about any of the following:
    .
    Grackles are more closely related to blackbirds- red-wing and yellow headed. Grackles are not Corvids.
    They are not related to crows.

    Even though a lot of people dislike Grackles, especially some farmers-
    Grackles are protected in North America by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.
    .
    An international Treaty – The Migratory Bird Treaty Act makes it illegal for anyone in the US to take, possess, import, export, transport, sell, purchase, barter, or offer for sale, purchase, or barter, any migratory bird, or the parts, nests, or eggs of such a bird except under the terms of a valid permit issued pursuant to Federal regulations.

    There are similar regulations in Canada, in Mexico and Central America, in Europe and Japan.
    .
    Some birds are not protected in North America, mostly non-native introduced species like European starlings, house sparrows and rock doves aka common pigeons.
    .
    There are exceptions which permit licensed hunting of game birds and exceptions allowing Native Americans to take and possess bird parts and feathers for religious purposes.
    .
    Regarding Agnes’ Grackle – I am still wondering why it just doesn’t fly out of that open box.
    .
    It must be humoring her.

  11. pschearer

    pschearer GoComics PRO Member said, about 5 hours ago

    @ellisaana

    This law (and many others) protect “nature” at the expense of the rights of humans. It is one of the few mistakes of the Constitution that treaties are treated as equal in force to the Constitution itself.

  12. ellisaana

    ellisaana GoComics PRO Member said, about 5 hours ago

    @pschearer

    Perhaps that is true now.
    .
    And there are a lot of other things wrong with the treaty – including making it illegal for a citizen to own and display a feather he picks up off the ground.
    .
    But, one of the original arguments for the 1918 treaty to protect birds was the idea that birds were a natural defense against ‘hostile’ crop-damaging insects.
    .
    1918 was long before the wide-spread use of pesticides to protect food crops.

  13. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, about 4 hours ago

    @pschearer

    Considering the rights of Nature protects humans maybe you should do a more deep analysis to understand just how ecocidal humans are of their own life support system.

  14. DavidHuieGreen

    DavidHuieGreen said, about 3 hours ago

    @pschearer

    “It is one of the few mistakes of the Constitution "
    .
    The Constitution has no mistakes. It simply is.
    We may not like aspects of the Constitution, but we have the means of lawfully changing it.
    Whenever we choose to not change it, it means we like it as it is better than we like any proposed changes to it.
    It’s like when people disagree with what - let us say - the president does. That doesn’t mean they AGREE on what he SHOULD have done, just that they wanted something else. Quite often what they wanted would have created even worse damage and is completely at odds with what half of the disagreers wanted.
    (No particular president in mind here, I’ve seen it out of each and every last one of them and how so many agree what they did was wrong but don’t agree on what was right.)

  15. DavidHuieGreen

    DavidHuieGreen said, about 2 hours ago

    @ellisaana

    I don’t know grackles, but the pictures look pretty enough.

    *"Grackles tend to congregate in large groups, popularly referred to as a plague or annoyance."
    .
    “Between 40 and 50 percent of the blackbird population dies every year. But these mortality figures are offset by the birds’ reproductive success. On average, a female produces two to four fledglings per year.”

    “Unlike many birds, the grackle benefits from the expansion of human populations due to its resourceful and opportunistic nature. Common grackles are considered a serious threat to crops by some, and notoriously difficult to exterminate and usually require the use of hawks or similar large birds of prey”
    .
    .
    .
    “…are native migratory birds and thus come under the jurisdiction of the Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act, a formal treaty with Canada and Mexico. Blackbirds are protected by Federal law (Title 50, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 21.43) in the United States except that they may be killed when found “committing or about to commit depredations upon ornamental or shade trees, agricultural crops, livestock, or wildlife, or when concentrated in such numbers and manner as to constitute a health hazard or other nuisance.” "
    .
    Which reads like they can be killed at any time they are a nuisance of any sort.

  16. Load the rest of the comments (1).